In a Keynote Presentation by Dr. Christian Busch, Associate Director, Innovation and Co-Creation Lab, London School of Economics, he started by talking about global trends and challenges, with the key issues being cloud computing, artificial intelligence (AI), connectedness, the networked economy, new markets, and new demographics. The overall theme was how innovation can progress in an ethical manner, using new ways of thinking about organisations and the distribution of power within them. He touched on technical developments, such as how the smart home, cloud, voice control, AI come together to deliver increased flexibility, simplicity, and collaboration. Talking about the enterprise, Busch said there was a trend towards a sharing economy for customers and companies. This means there is no need for ownership of things but instead, only a requirement for access to them. In practice, this means collaborative consumption such as the sharing of items from CDs to cars, in ways that are already happening in smaller communities across the world in both developing and developed economies. The world is full of idle resources, he said, and we should be able to share more – such as idle manufacturing resources and building site cranes. Busch then updated Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, which he described as self-centred and linear, in that people wait until until money has been made before deciding to do good works. Billgates was used as an example. He said he sees another model emerging across the world – the enlightened circle of needs – which means not being too self-centred, and not waiting for time to elapse so as to undertake a behavioural shift to doing good while making money at the same time. It’s about action-driven purpose, in other words putting purpose before product, he said. How to go about it? Busch said it was about building values within an organisation, a culture of learning not failure, championing others, not competing with them. From the point of view of governance, an organisation needs to work around new business models. As an example, he cited mobile operators who co-operate when it comes to sharing masts but compete at the retail level. Busch said that we need to develop a culture of innovation where people talk about ideas not people or gossip, where effective networks can be built that combine the formal hierarchy with the way that decisions are taken in practice. An analogy is the way that companies accelerate the process of discovery of new compounds – it’s about curating serendipity by putting thinking people together – like chemistry. Courtesy: NetEvents

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Sandeep Bazaz , Industry Analyst, DataCenter and Cloud Computing, Frost & Sullivan reported that there will be billions of Internet-connected devices – 10 per household by 2020 and growing. He predicted that logistics, transport & retail would be the biggest initial users of IoT. Q: IoT challenges apart from security? Amit Sinha Roy, Vice President, Marketing & Strategy, Tata Communications, said connectivity; power/battery; standards, ie prioritisation of data – does the smart TV or pacemaker get priority; legal – but what about insurance of driverless car? Haytham Sawalhy, Head of IoT for APAC, Orange Cloud for Business, Asia Pacific, questioned what would be the business models, and who would finance the devices. Q: Role of telco and monetising the IoT? Ashwin Jaiswal, Head – IT Business Consulting & Practice (Telecom, Media & Entertainment), said telcos will help the IoT grow, helped by government initiatives. He said that the way people use technology will change. It’s amazing, beautiful, promising, he said. There will be a variety of business models and usages. As for challenges, telcos will become more aggressive – they have cloud and lots of subscribers – and their role will grow. Sawalhy said we see opportunities with IoT and big data. We push valuable data to enterprise customers so, for example, we identify tourists in France to understand where they go and what they do. We believe in co-innovation, he said. Roy said the pay-per-use will be the typical business model – for example, in healthcare remote monitoring – on asubscription basis. Jaiswal said people are moving to pre-pay billing across the world. Q: What about risk? Panitharn Payackapan, Department Director – Service Development & Process, UIH – United Information Highway Co., Ltd., said the IoT is like a new restaurant. You try it, and if you don’t get sick, you go back again. So if consumer experience of IoT is good they will return. And when my smart watch exports data to the cloud, and the insurance company finds out that I’m fit, it wil then reduce its premiums. Q: Will IoT become part of AI systems? Sawalhy said the IoT is not just about live data but also disconnected data, so AI plays a role there. Q: Is the network ready to handle IoT? Payackapan said: Yes, we’re ready. FTTx is everywhere. Courtesy: NetEvents

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Dustin Kehoe, Head of AP Telecoms Practice, Current Analysis said that the technology industry is moving to open – open hardware, software, source, APIs, and interfaces. The future will be a platform play, he said, and be about building modular datacentres. Two problems face us: networks which are still slow, and offer static workloads with manual configuration, and cloud, especially hybrid, which requires multiple layers of management. Solutions are still vendor-specific, vendors still don’t work together and want to lock in the customer. Even if you build your own IP, it leads to fragmentation. As for SDN, IT process automation is the main use case. SDN is mature today, and we are seeing deployments in all areas of the globe including APAC. Research finds that the top three expectations are that it will improve network reliability, accelerate application deployment, and lead to better integration. Customers want open source to avoid lock-in but find it difficult to locate the right open source skills. Jon Vestal, Vice President, Product Architecture, Telstra, said his company uses open source OpenStack with SDN. Growing pains included asking network engineers who knew proprietary systems such as IOS and having to teach them them Python! It was a comedy of errors, probably the worst thing we ever did, he said, but it had to be done. Jonathan Seckler, Director, Product Marketing, Dell Networking, said switches are servers from a hardware architectural standpoint. The trend is toward open networks, although back in 1990s, enterprise applications ran on mainframes – you wouldn’t do that now because it’s proprietary – but that’s still how it is in the network. Open source takes cost out of the maintenance and hardware acquisition. Gint Atkinson, Vice President – Head, Technology Asia, Colt Technology Services Co., Ltd, question whether such hardware was carrier grade. Installing new stacks etc takes decades – back in the day we did build routers using open source software. In the end you had to build it to look like a mainframe but it wasn’t as fast as a focused proprietary system. There are no open solutions to give under 50ms routing failover. SDN can fit in if you’ve got a minute or two but rerouting protection isn’t fast enough on open source. Steven Davis, Senior Vice President, Global Data Centre, ST Telemedia Connect, said cloud grade services (eg Facebook) are all run on SDN. Another key issue is price, Cisco etc are too expensive. Derrick Loi, Senior Director, DC Solution and Services, Orange Cloud for Business, Asia Pacific, said the key enterprise concern is digital transformation. So we want to keep the intelligence and provide end2end services. Also the network needs to be application ready and intelligent enough to automate, based on workloads. It’s about how we orchestrate infrastructure within the datacentre. We have integrated over 80 ope source applications and customers can integrate their own applications. Effectively it’s IaaS, all automated. So we link SDDC with SDN. Q: Where are we at? Davis said after the cloud, hyper-convergence is coming via a single portal to control all your clouds. We’re starting to see that coming now. Vestal said carriers didn’t at one point meet customer needs but now they are offering services and products that allow interconnection. Seckler said the model is outside the network industry. Enterprises needs partners to package OSS open source software to make it easier to manage and deliver a service. It’s not a DIY process for most enterprises, not realistic to do a Google or Facebook – it’s not about going to white boxes and recompiling every day. Davis said it took the open source software market seven years to catch up with what Oracle was doing – PostgreSQL did it. Atkinson said what’s needed is a network that supports a wide range of services. Courtesy: NetEvents

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Jeremiah Caron, Senior Vice President – Analysis, Current Analysis asked: What are the challenges for telcos? We worry about them! But they are making money – he gave plenty of example of very profitable telcos – but what challenges do they face? Operators do understand the importance of SDN/NFV but there’s not much urgency. They want to grow the top line not just reduce costs. The biggest challenge is a lack of corporate focus – can upfront costs of SDN be justified? Also analytics – can they monetise all the data they collect? There are not many interesting moneymaking cases yet – so it’s early days. But from the cloud user’s perspective, the telco is not a priority. With respect to mobility, telcos are not focused much on this in consumer space, they are focused more on B2B. And no-one focused yet on 5G standards. With the IoT there are lots of opportunities – but where do you start? Andy Solterbeck, Regional Director – APAC, Cylance, asked: can telcos truly innovate? They need to develop new business models but no-one knows what the look like. They need to be nimble when they’ve always been about long term investments and sweating them. Matt Allcoat, Chief Architect, Asia Pacific, Middle East, Africa & Turkey, BT Global Services, said we work with top F1 teams. We their run LANs, data processing, and data transmission to the back end in UK. It’s all about doing it for the customer from the front end. Helen Wong, Director, Partner & Product Strategy Asia Pacific, Verizon, said it’s about connecting to the customer at the business level. Caron noted that some telcos such as are BT moving into content delivery. Gint Atkinson, Vice President – Head, Technology Asia, Colt Technology Services Co., Ltd, said we used to focus on niche markets such as the financial sector with high frequency trading with high performance storage and compute etc. It was very capital intensive. It also led us from low latency services into ultra-high capacity services for cloud providers. But telcos have massive investments into resources, eg dark fibre, they need to squeeze every bit of money out of those assets. As example is gaming companies who need servers with hundreds of thousands of users who need low latency globally. So this needs a set of services providers who work together using, for example, redundant ETREE services. The connectivity provider needs to reach all the way into the cloud, which means working with cloud providers and their APIs. Stephen Tsang, Head of Managed Services and Enterprise Architects, Telstra, asked about the impact of SDN. Many of our customers are mining companies – some of whom have lost $10b of business. This feeds back to suppliers. So we’ve pulled items such as SDN/NFV forward very quickly. Wrapping it into a business driver is the challenge. Cost savings are around operations and mining companies are becoming tech companies too, just like finance companies. So they value us in a different way. Frank Wiener, VP Marketing, Wedge Networks, asked who is responsible for security – the network provider? Network security is the user responsibility, you can’t assume the service provider will deliver security. He noted that adding a security service can add stickiness and revenue. Solterbeck said security should come from the carrier as they have visibility into all the data. They can make money out of this – it surprises me they aren’t doing more of this. Helen Wong, Verizon, said we are moving into virtual functions service for private clouds. We have cut down the number of vendors for VMS servers to two. WAN optimisation is our second priority after security – then threat monitoring and load balancing. Matt Allcoat, BT, said there’s a great opportunity to provide OTT services such as security. We’ve also entered TV and mobile in the UK. Need to collaborate with other providers to make networks that give more customers what they want. Wiener said there’s a logical extension to go from data to security – then offer it to others who aren’t going through your network. Tsang said we know more about our customers than most utilities. Courtesy: NetEvents

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Anaplan, the Smart Business Platform, unveiled predictive analytics capabilities that enable foresight into the most complex planning and operating scenarios. Anaplan makes predictive data available in real time to departments across an entire business, ensuring that all analytics are updated dynamically and that decision-makers have the same instant access. “Global companies are increasingly adopting predictive analytics, but don’t have the ability to easily simulate or configure those analytics to reflect reality for decision-makers in a way where they can confidently take action,” said Simon Tucker, Chief Product Officer. Simon added: “Anaplan overcomes this by seamlessly connecting the predictive functionality with the modeling and planning functions regular business people use everyday in Anaplan. These new functions can be applied to use cases across the business spectrum, from optimizing airline flight delay predictions to clinical trial success to sales forecasting.” Anaplan’s predictive capabilities will initially be introduced for statistical forecasting in demand planning, sales and operations planning, corporate planning and budgeting, sales forecasting, and customer support. Future capabilities will extend to workforce optimization, supply network planning, transportation assignment, product marketing, and many more. “Predictive analytics bring powerful new insights to the planning world, and Anaplan is an early mover in offering this capability to enterprises. Of all the business processes, planning and modeling are among those that can most benefit from the addition of predictive analytics to enhance human intelligence,” commented Doug Henschen, Constellation Research. Capabilities like Monte Carlo simulations, smoothing methods, and multivariable linear regression will add advanced statistical forecasting and modeling processes across all business operations. Predictive capabilities are now in closed beta with select customers. They will be introduced to Anaplan’s Smart Business Platform™ later this year. The new capabilities were previewed at Hub16, the annual event for people using Anaplan’s business planning platform and apps. Hub16 runs through Wednesday, May 11 at the Masonic Theater and the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco. More than 1,500 technology innovators, analysts, and business executives are attending, including executives from Anaplan customers and partners such as Deloitte, DocuSign, Kellogg Company, and Splunk.

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Cylance, the company that is revolutionizing cybersecurity through the use of artificial intelligence to proactively prevent advanced persistent threats and malware, announced the expansion of its Asia-Pacific operations with a tailored approach ideal for satisfying customer needs in specific APAC countries. Since the company’s official launch into APAC earlier this year, Cylance has had great success in establishing a presence in Japan, partnering with Hitachi Solutions and MOTEX to accelerate its entry into the Japanese market, where customer interest and adoption are exceptionally strong. In Australia, Cylance has already established a strong partnership with Aquion, the first reseller of CylancePROTECT endpoint protection products for Australia and New Zealand. As Cylance expands beyond its initial Japanese and Australian engagement, the company has signed a further three new reseller partners in the Australian/New Zealand region. Cylance have ongoing plans to expand further throughout APAC, and are in the process of bringing on board a number of Managed Security Service Providers (MSSPs) and other IT solution providers to extend its footprint and better serve their customers as part of the ongoing expansion into Asia. Len Findlay, Founder and CEO of VMtech said, “Cylance is a key component in our security practice offering. Endpoint security is an area that’s been in great need for a disruptor such as Cylance to hit the market with a unique and innovative approach in delivering protection to the end user.” Len added: “After testing Cylance PROTECT in our own labs and comparing it to legacy endpoint security technologies we were keen to take it to market, so when our own experience was echoed with our customer base, we knew we picked the right partner. We see huge market potential here in Australia. If our initial customer feedback is anything to go by, this will be a technology to watch in the coming months and years.” Cylance has produced the world’s most advanced malware detection and attack prevention technology, which is protecting more than 1000 global organizations and millions of computers today. With significant customer interest throughout Asia, Cylance will strategically evaluate the requirements across each region, determining who they will be partnering with across distribution, solutions providers and MSSPs. Cylance has developed an innovative way of stopping malware before it ever executes, using a lightweight agent that predicts and prevents cyber threats using artificial intelligence and machine learning. With ransomware emerging as one of the most challenging cyber threats of 2016 causing real harm to businesses and individuals across the globe, Cylance has established itself as a world leader in combating ransomware attacks with prevention, as well as helping new customers who have called upon Cylance for assistance in remediation from the effects of cyber attacks that leveraged Trojan malware. With customized cyberattack toolkits available to hackers, this strain of malware is currently causing 90,000 infections per day, and costing businesses worldwide $60 million dollars per year in breach-related costs. Andy Solterbeck, Regional Director, APAC for Cylance, said, “We are seeing tremendous interest with partners across the APAC region, whose customers are desperate for a preventive endpoint solution that really works. Working with our partners, we know that the best way to satisfy customer demand for Cylance solution in APAC is to focus on specific partners for each country.” Andy added: “We have used Australia as a launch pad into APAC, enabling us to gain significant traction in Japan. Our strategy will continue to be about evaluating the requirements for each country and then determining the best approach for engaging that market through partners, resellers, distributors, solution providers (VARs) and MSSPs.”

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Dell Networking has introduced new capabilities for campus and data center environments, including the launch of new cloud-managed wired and wireless solutions powered by Dell and Aerohive, Operating System 10 milestones and in-rack platforms for the data center. “Major trends such as cloud and software-defined create a dynamically changing IT landscape, both on campus and in the data center,” said Tom Burns, vice president and general manager, Dell Networking and Enterprise Infrastructure. “These new Dell Networking solutions help our customers navigate these changes with future-ready architectures, open technology and hyper-scale inspired efficiency.” Expanding Dell One Network vision – new cloud-managed wired/wireless campus solution powered by Dell and Aerohive Building on its One Network campus vision, Dell Networking has collaborated with Aerohive to deliver a new cloud-managed solution that integrates and manages wired and wireless infrastructure. The co-branded solution incorporates Dell N-Series switches and Aerohive access points into Aerohive’s HiveManager NG – a next-generation cloud-based management solution. This solution greatly simplifies end-user access, setting a new standard for wired and wireless network convergence by bringing enterprise-class management to the public or private cloud. With a customizable user-focused interface, HiveManager NG allows for high-level or in-depth views of all facets of Dell and Aerohive networking devices including applications, users, policy management and switch port status. Further simplifying wired and wireless converged network management, Dell has expanded its industry-leading ProSupport to provide users with a single point of contact for unified network support. Through SupportAssist technology, ProSupport offers proactive and predictive automated support for issue prevention and resolution. Movement Mortgage is one of the nation’s fastest-growing, privately-held mortgage companies, employing more than 2,000 people, at more than 300 branches across the United States. “To have a unified wireless platform across all operations and branch offices, and have it just work has undeniably advanced the efficiency and productivity for our employees, as well as streamlined operations for our IT staff,” said Will Simons, IT Director, Movement Mortgage. These milestones demonstrate Dell and Aerohive’s shared vision of cloud-managed IT, providing streamlined operations, configuration, monitoring and troubleshooting for all elements of customers’ networks. “We believe cloud management has the opportunity to transform the way our customers serve their customers,” said David Flynn, CEO, Aerohive Networks. “We are proud to extend enterprise-class cloud management that Aerohive customers use to manage our access points to Dell’s switches. HiveManager NG sets the standard for building and managing networks.”

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Ixia , a leading provider of network testing, visibility, and security solutions,announced that QualiTest, a global, pure play software testing and quality assurance company, has joined Ixia’s Global Solution Provider Program to accelerate the delivery of proven, network test solutions to enterprises and service providers around the world. QualiTest designs and delivers contextualized solutions that leverage deep industry-specific understanding with technology-specific competencies and unique testing-focused assets. Adding Ixia’s test solutions to their portfolio allows QualiTest to emulate realistic media-rich traffic and conditions to rapidly assess and validate the performance of networks, devices, and services, as well as enable service providers to efficiently migrate to next generation Network Function Virtualization (NFV) architectures. Benny Sand, QualiTest Director of Strategy, says “We are very excited about our partnership with Ixia. The combination of Ixia tools and QualiTest services provides a comprehensive testing solution to the telecom industry for traditional technology, as well as in new environments such as NFV and IoT.” Ixia’s end-to-end testing solutions deliver the functional and system testing needed by enterprises and service providers: from ensuring high-performing applications and secure networks with IxLoad and BreakingPoint, to validating the scalability and performance of a physical or virtual network infrastructure with IxNetwork. “We’re delighted to welcome QualiTest to the Ixia Global Solution Provider network,” said Lori Cornmesser, Vice President of Global Channel Sales at Ixia. “It’s a pleasure to work with an organization that delivers results by combining customer-centric business models, critical thinking, and the ability to gain a profound comprehension of customers’ goals and challenges.”

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APAC countries must take note of the prevalence of ransomware attacks in the U.S. and Europe. The good news is that tools and technologies are emerging to combat these cybercrimes. Ransomware is a huge problem that’s causing real harm to businesses and individuals. Technology service providers are gearing up to fight these cyberattacks – and that’s coming none too soon. Ransomware is a type of cyberattack, where bad actors gain access to a system, such as an individual’s desktop or a corporate server, often via an unsuspecting person clicking on malware attached to an email, visiting a corrupted site or opening a document containing a macro that downloads the malware. Most often, the malware encrypts the user’s data and demands an untraceable ransom (usually bitcoins) in exchange for decryption. Once the malware has got in, there’s nothing to stop it from scanning for passwords, bank account information or other sensitive intellectual property. For the consumer and the enterprise, this is a scary and very real invasion. The scope of these ransomware attacks is huge. In the U.S. the Federal Bureau of Investigation received 2,453 complaints about ransomware cyberattacks in 2015, which the FBI says cost the victims more than $24 million dollars in ransom. Who knows how many people quietly paid and didn’t tell anyone because of shame, perhaps, or lack of knowledge about who to tell? According to Jayendra Pathak, Chief Architect at NSS Labs, a top tech security analyst firm based in Austin, Tex., these attacks are most prevalent in the US and Europe, but are fast penetrating Asia Pacific as well. In this article, leading experts James Hamilton – CEO of Wedge Networks, Jason Steer – EMEA Solutions Architect for Menlo Security and Andy Solterbeck – Regional Director APAC for Cylance, give their views on the biggest security threat of modern times. The key is prevention and we must take note as the problem is global and rapidly gaining momentum. By Alan Zeichick, Principal Analyst, Camden Associates

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Leading Analyst Firm Recognizes Innovative, Intriguing and Impactful Companies in the Communication Service Provider Security Market. Wedge Networks, the leader in Orchestrated Threat Management, today announced that it has been named a Cool Vendor based on the April 20, 2016, report titled, “Cool Vendors in Communications Service Provider Security Solutions, 2016,” by Deborah Kish, Principal Research Analyst and Akshay Sharma, Research Director in the Carrier Network Infrastructure group at Gartner Inc. The report evaluates interesting, new and innovative vendors, products and services in the security market that help carriers and service providers become more competitive, as well as offer new value-added services to their enterprise, government and home customers. In the report, Gartner explains that carriers and service providers (CSPs) “are looking for ways to move from siloed networking appliances toward fluid and dynamic cloud-based security solutions that support end-to-end control, along with dynamic pay-as-you-grow provisioning that can be provided with virtualized and orchestrated security systems.“ “We are honored to be named a Gartner Cool Vendor for 2016,” said James Hamilton, CEO of Wedge Networks. “We believe that the cloud is the center of nearly every network – it’s the last stop for data entering an organization, and the last stop for traffic exiting to the outside world.” James added: “The cloud is the ideal place to implement security, and that’s why we provide cloud-based security for some of the world’s largest networks. By developing a revolutionary orchestrated threat management platform, Wedge Networks offers elastic scale security that is embedded in our customer’s cloud to protect all network users, with all devices, from all locations.” The information provided in the Gartner report is of value to all IT professionals who are seeking to protect their networks using cutting edge cloud security, and to all CSPs and managed service providers looking for new value-added services to offer their customers.

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