Smartphones will account for two out of every three mobile connections globally by 2020, said global mobile operators industry body GSMA . The study, “Smartphone forecasts and assumptions, 2007-2020″ conducted by GSMA Intelligence, a research wing of the GSMA, predicts that the number of smartphone connections will grow three-fold over the next six years. The report puts India at the fourth slot in top 10 global smartphones markets. According to GSMA, India had 111-million smartphone connections in the second quarter of 2014, trailing leader China, US and Brazil. Asia Pacific accounts for about half of the global smartphone connections, even though smartphone penetration in the region is currently below 40%

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About 1,538 MHz of spectrum in various bands for telecom services may be made available for auction next year, a move that will help the government expand mobile and broadband penetration in the country. In the premium 700 Mhz band, which can be used for 4G and is even being considered for 5G services, 93 MHz of radiowaves can be put for sale. In the 800 MHz (CMDA), 900 MHz and 1,800 MHz bands 117.5 MHz, 184 MHz and 104 MHz, respectively, can be made available, sources said. In 2,300 MHz band (broadband wireless access spectrum) 320 MHz spectrum and in the 2,500 MHz band, about 720 MHz could also be put on the block for sale, they added. Source

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The Indian telecom sector will witness consolidation in the near future, according to Uninor India CEO Morten Karlsen Sorby. He said: “While it (consolidation) has been speculated since 2008-09, nothing has really happened on larger consolidations in the country.” Sorby said that although the Indian market is huge, there is a shared view among the players as well as the regulator, Telecome Regulatory Authority of India, that the sector needs a certain scale and that the economics is still weak. Uninor India, a subsidiary of Norway’s Telenor, is adding roughly 800,000 new customers every month, he said, adding the consolidated user base now stands at 42 million across its six operating circles. (Source)

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The telecom regulator has rued India’s dismal broadband penetration and questioned the telecom department’s decision to only involve state-owned companies to implement the Rs 21,000-crore national optic fibre network (NOFN) project, which is already running three years behind schedule. In a consultation paper, titled ‘Delivering Broadband Quickly’ unveiled Wednesday, the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (Trai) has also invited industry feedback on a relevant “timeframe for auctioning spectrum in the 700 MHz band,” to offer the most efficient airwaves to telcos for boosting India’s poor broadband penetration. It has also invited suggestions on awarding engineering, procurement & construction (EPC) contracts to private telecom operators through the international competitive bidding route to speed up NOFN, which will be the core broadband backbone for delivering high-speed internet and government services to the common man under the Centre’s Rs 1.13 lakh-crore Digital India drive.

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Vodafone, the world’s second-largest telecom service provider by subscribers, said Thursday that slow government clearances had made it difficult for foreign companies to do business in India, even as the company continues to face taxation issues in the country. The UK-based telco, which has invested about $20 billion in India, said the Indian government should accelerate the decision-making process and facilitate market consolidation to improve the sector, which has been reeling under spectrum constraints. Source

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CENX, a global leader of Service Orchestration solutions for software-defined networks, today announced that it is collaborating with MEF member companies, Accedian Networks, EXFOand JDSU, for product interoperability, to usher in the Metro Ethernet Forum (MEF) vision of The Third Network. MEF’s vision of a new network, which marries the ubiquity of the public Internet with the performance and security benefits of private networks, can only be realized with a vendor ecosystem that supports open programmable interfaces for agile service fulfillment and assurance. “CENX continues to be solidly aligned with MEF initiatives with Cortx Service Orchestrator. We are committed to the realization of The Third Network vision,” said Chris Purdy, CTO of CENX. “Our successful cooperation with Accedian Networks, EXFO and JDSU paves the way to achieving the goal of on-demand, dynamically-upgradeable, quality-assured network services.” The Third Network vision converges with other industry initiatives: LTE, Cloud, SDN and NFV. This networking transformation brings tremendous revenue and savings opportunities yet introduces complexity to service providers’ operations. CENX’s Cortx Service Orchestrator provides the needed abstraction layer for streamlined services management across network domains and technologies. Using open interfaces, Cortx Service Orchestrator interoperates with a broad industry ecosystem, including leading probe and test vendors, OSS, NMS, SDN Controllers, NFV Orchestrators, and network elements, to initiate actions and mine network big data in real-time. Analytics results are visualized on the Cortx graphical dashboards. • CENX’s Cortx Service Orchestrator and EXFO’s BrixWorx assurance system are jointly deployed at a mobile Tier 1 service provider for real-time troubleshooting and SLA management in its backhaul network. The BrixWorx system delivers highly scalable and reliable service validation and assurance for IP/Ethernet services, enabling secure, remote deployment and management across the entire network. Cortx Service Orchestrator consumes BrixWorx’s Service Operations, Administration and Maintenance (SOAM) test results for real-time analytics of utilization and performance. “Leveraging the advanced activation, monitoring and reporting capabilities from EXFO’s service validation and assurance solution, CENX Cortx Service Orchestrator gives the operator complete visibility into every layer of the infrastructure, from transport to advance services, making it simple to segment the network to predict and diagnose faults as well as targeting diagnostic efforts towards specific network areas for faster and more effective intervention,” said Claudio Mazzuca, VP of EXFO’s Service Assurance Division. • CENX’s Cortx Service Orchestrator has been jointly deployed with JDSU’s EtherAssure Solution in a Tier 1 service provider’s mobile backhaul network for service activation, real-time fault isolation, and performance management. The JDSU EtherAssure solution, combined with PacketPortal JMEP (JDSU’s Micro Ethernet Probe), is a scalable, vendor-agnostic, end-to-end assurance solution for Ethernet services activation and real-time monitoring. ”JDSU EtherAssure, together with CENX Cortx Service Orchestrator, uniquely simplifies and scales Ethernet lifecycle management from order entry, to service activation and performance monitoring,” said Richard Piasentin, VP and GM of JDSU PacketPortal and Ethernet Assurance business.

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MEF announces a new THIRD Network vision that delivers Internet-like agility and ubiquity with CE 2.0-like performance and security. The THIRD Network vision is based upon Network as a Service (NaaS) principles, builds on CE 2.0 and provides a beacon for new MEF work already underway and planned. Examples of THIRD Network initiatives include Lifecycle Service Orchestration, new service definitions, dynamic service attributes, and agile API development. “We are embarking on the next stage of a remarkable journey,” said Bob Metcalfe, Inventor of Ethernet, Advisory Director of the MEF, and Professor of Innovation at the University of Texas. “MEF is announcing a new network paradigm, a THIRD Network vision for Agile, Assured, and Orchestrated Network as a Service worldwide.” To summarize the argument, businesses today are served by two types of modern data networks: * Virtual Private Networks based on CE 2.0, using transport technologies such as MPLS, etc., delivering services with assured performance and security, but taking days if not months to initiate across multiple provider environments. * The Internet, delivering on-demand, ubiquitous services but leaving users to deal with security and performance issues. ”We believe that the world needs a new network that builds upon the strengths of both the Internet and CE 2.0 and enhances them with end-to-end lifecycle service orchestration,” says Nan Chen, President of the MEF. “Combining the availability and agility of the Internet with the assurance in performance and security of CE 2.0 will allow us to create a network so flexible and robust that the network itself can be delivered as a customized virtual service – opening up unlimited possibilities for new business models and market growth.” The THIRD Network will deliver Agile, Assured and Orchestrated Network as a Service worldwide, where: * Agile means delivery of new, dynamic, on-demand services *Assured means delivery of performance and security guarantees *Orchestrated means delivery of automated services across multiple service providers – an escalating requirement driven by the rapid globalization of CE2.0 services. The new THIRD Network is more than just a vision, according to Metcalfe, and work is already underway to bring “layered abstraction” to the WAN. “In computing, hardware is separated from operating systems and from applications, so each layer can innovate without impacting the others. In telecom operations, different systems are often in functional silos.” Metcalfe added, “Three major co-operative industry initiatives – NFV, SDN and Service Orchestration – are coming together to develop more responsive and adaptable solutions.” NFV allows general purpose VMs for every network function, instead of vendor specific elements, while SDN is moving control functions into central controllers. But neither addresses directly the connectivity services that business or individuals actually purchase. This is where MEF provides a vital part of dynamic delivery and management of the new THIRD Network, a Network as a Service. According to Andrew McFadzen, MEF Chairman and Head of Global Marketing, Network Services at Orange Business Services, “Initial work underway includes defining service lifecycle elements, extending information models and service attributes to be dynamic and protocol independent, and developing open-standards-based APIs. All the new capabilities leverage and build upon CE 2.0 as the services platform, to ensure an optimal migration strategy.”

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Telekomunikasi Indonesia International Pte Ltd (Telin Singapore), a member of PT Telekomunikasi Indonesia Tbk, a state-owned telecommunication and network provider has achieved the industry’s highest level of certification for the design and delivery of Carrier Ethernet (CE) Network Services with 8 services. Telin Singapore is recognized as having a robust carrier network infrastructure, and is ready to deliver advanced connectivity services to enterprises including financial services, mining and the manufacturing industries between Hong Kong, Indonesia and Singapore. “This is a very significant milestone for the future business growth of Telin Singapore and this development will continue to solidify the trust from our customers in utilizing our Ethernet Network Connectivity Services.” said Sendang Praptomo, Head of Business Development and Strategic planning of Telin Singapore. “We are able to demonstrate quality and credibility in our products and services offering in order to meet the needs of our enterprise customers. We look forward to build partnerships with other CE 2.0 APAC network providers to have interconnections in order to extend our network coverage and solutions across Asia Pacific Region.” To receive the certification, Telin Singapore demonstrated that its Carrier Ethernet services comply with a host of relevant and rigorous MEF specifications and testing. The MEF has granted Telin Singapore CE 2.0 certification to the complete portfolio of 8 CE 2.0 Services including E-Line, E-Tree, E-LAN and E-Access across 3 regions covering Indonesia, Singapore and Hong Kong. “CE 2.0 is a highly challenging and significant accreditation to achieve, and to receive accreditation for the complete MEF certification portfolio is an outstanding achievement, one that demonstrates the quality of Telin Singapore’s network services capability. MEF CE 2.0 Certification creates an important standard of deployment for the marketplace,” said Nan Chen, President of the MEF.

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The THIRD Network

by Paul Joseph on September 28, 2014 · 0 comments

The Internet is everywhere, and available on-demand – but it offers no service guarantees, and leaves security to the user. CE 2.0 delivers assured performance and security levels – but it can take weeks to establish a service. The world needs a THIRD Network, says MEF President Nan Chen. In 2012 Ethernet bandwidth for business overtook all legacy WAN technologies, and it continues to surge ahead (See pic below) Also, according to Infonetics Research, Carrier Ethernet revenue in services and equipment will reach $350 billion cumulatively during the next 4 years. Effectively this means that Carrier Ethernet (CE 2.0) is now the universal “glue” holding global business together – a role once provided by the PSTN during the 20th Century. Just consider the two cases: the reliability, performance levels and relative security provided by today’s business services connecting offices across the globe, then compare that with the service mobile workers can expect in their own homes, hotels or on the move when using the Internet. Of course the miracle of the Internet is that the latter services can still be immediately available almost anywhere, via fixed line or mobile connection, but the downside is that premium office services raise expectations of performance and Quality of Service (QoS) that make mobile business seem slow and frustrating by comparison. It is hard to maintain really effective business negotiations, or technical discussions, when the video image keeps freezing while the speaker talks on – let alone deal with the extra burdens of encryption and security required for safer business. In both cases the real issue for the user is “connectivity service”. In the former case the service quality, performance and security is outstanding once the service has been established – a process that can take weeks, especially if the connection spans more than one service provider network. In the latter case the service is ubiquitous, immediate and on-demand, but falls short on quality, performance and security. This is the challenge MEF is now addressing: to envision a THIRD Network that combines the best of both; a THIRD Network that delivers business-class connectivity as a ubiquitous, on-demand service – rather than as a laborious and lengthy installation and commissioning process. In the words of Bob Metcalfe, Inventor of Ethernet, Professor of Innovation at the University of Texas and Advisory Director of the MEF: “Today we are embarking on the next stage of this remarkable journey with a new vision of the future of network services, building on CE2.0 capabilities. MEF is announcing a new network paradigm, a new THIRD Network vision for Agile, Assured, and Orchestrated services worldwide, one which is based on emerging Network as a Service principles”. A fertile ground for innovation It is all very well to express a vision for the future, but is the environment ready and able to make the vision a reality? It was 2010, four years ago, when I gave a presentation comparing Ethernet with the global PSTN, calling for: “a public service Ethernet network bound to provide Ethernet connectivity across the globe as easily as making a telephone call”. A lot has happened since I expressed that long-term vision. For a start CE 2.0 E-Access provision has made it so much easier to extend services across multiple carrier footprints – the service is increasingly ubiquitous, although it still takes time to establish business SLAs. Then there is market preparedness: as I write this we already have over seventy companies offering over three hundred CE 2.0 certified services and products – and that is merely since last year’s launch of the certification program – and this number is fast expanding. The importance of this technology is no secret to the business world – we already have over two thousand five hundred MEF Certified Professionals across sixty-five countries worldwide, and that represents a tenfold increase since the launch of CE 2.0. Next there is the question of need. Humans can be very adaptable, and mobile workers have so far been managing to cope pretty well with the Internet connectivity available, considering its limitations, but the pressure for reform is mounting. It is not just the business-class expectations raised by CE 2.0, there is also the pressure of cloud adoption. As a universal solution – and that ultimately is a vital part of the Cloud’s value proposition – cloud computing will demand all the agility, assuredness and orchestration promised by the THIRD Network. Then there is M2M communications as the next “cloud on the horizon” – while human workers may adapt to whatever best effort service is available, machine to machine communications will demand automatic and immediate delivery on demand. The THIRD Network To summarise the argument, business today is served by two types of data networks: Virtual Private Networks based on CE 2.0, MPLS etc., delivering services with assured performance and security, but taking days if not months to initiate across multiple providers. The Internet, delivering on-demand, ubiquitous services but leaving users to deal with security and performance issues. The MEF believes that there is a need for a new THIRD Network, delivering Agile, Assured and Orchestrated services worldwide, where: Agile means delivery of real-time on-demand services. Assured means delivery of performance and security guarantees Orchestrated means automated delivery of services across multiple service providers. How is MEF planning to realise this vision? The solution begins with a simple question: “What makes it so hard to deliver the above type of service today?”. The answer is that in today’s telecom operations we do not yet have “layered abstraction”. In computing, Hardware is separated from Operating Systems and from Applications, so that each layer can innovate without impacting layers above or below. In telecom operations, however, different systems are in functional silos – with separate inventory, provisioning performance and fault management systems, for example. Each such functional system must hold detailed information of all domains – like Optical, Ethernet or IP. A change in any one domain would result in changing all systems – and that takes extraordinary effort, time and money (See fig below) But using Network as a Services (NaaS) principles, we can develop a layered approach for telecoms operations, to break down complex problems, domain by domain, layer by layer. To achieve this, the industry is working together in three major initiatives – NFV, SDN and Service Orchestration – to develop more responsive and adaptable solutions. NFV allows us to use general purpose VMs instead of vendor specific network elements, for every network function. SDN is moving control functions in network elements into central controllers. Both NFV and SDN, while providing fundamental building blocks for the THIRD Network, are concerned with network element functions and control – but not the connectivity services businesses or individuals actually purchase. This is where the MEF’s Standardized Service Orchestration comes in – See fig below Service Orchestration manages the entire lifecycle of connectivity services: Fulfillment, Control, Performance, Assurance, Usage, and Analytics. It holds detailed service inventory of all services in a layer or domain, providing the necessary APIs for information exchange between service providers and internal systems operating at other layers. Such Service Orchestration is the MEF’s immediate objective. Initial work so far includes: the definition of Service Orchestration lifecycle elements; extending information models to be dynamic and protocol independent; and developing open-standards-based APIs where needed. All new capabilities leverage and build upon CE 2.0 as the services platform, and this ensures an optimal migration strategy. It is important to remember that this new THIRD Network can only come into being if we work closely with many and diverse industry leaders. So an expanded collaboration program has been established, called “Unite”, involving key industry standards development bodies. Unite is critical to the acceleration of deployment and realization of the anticipated benefits for all stakeholders, for the THIRD Network – much like CE 2.0 and the Internet/IP Networks – will profoundly change the way we work, live and play. How we will work, live and play First imagine the impact of the THIRD Network on anyone taking a business trip. Just by connecting, whether in a hotel or on the move, your personal NaaS performance profile will be automatically loaded, a business-class connection automatically setup – and you are ready for business. Performance-assured network experience will be available to millions of users with enormous market potential – an exciting prospect for all stakeholders. Next consider an Enterprise network where customer orders, placed via APIs or portals, initiate automated instructions that flow through to interconnected operators – provisioning virtual service connections where available and physical installations at remote user sites where not. This shows the power of standardized service orchestration, it creates a pervasive virtual network as a platform for on-demand businesses services. Cloud service delivery will become seamless, with service on-demand network services that interconnect user locations to their virtual machines or Virtual Network Functions running on blade servers inside a remote data center. Automated inter-carrier service orchestration will manage all connectivity – inside and outside the data center. Finally, to give a taste of what the THIRD Network could mean for society beyond the world of business, I refer back to that presentation I gave in 2010, where I also introduced a concept I called ”Personal Ethernet”. I gave a single household as an example: Dad, is a media executive needing massive bandwidth to download hi-def video samples; Mum is a social worker, highly reliant on VoIP for counselling and departmental conference calls; Daughter needs reliable fast Internet for schoolwork; Son is crazy about on-line gaming and needs massive bandwidth plus minimal latency and packet loss. The THIRD Network could deliver all these personalized requirements “as a Service” that would be available equally at home, at work, in school… or even while on vacation. Personal Ethernet would be the ultimate prize for fixed and mobile convergence, and the THIRD Network will make it a practical proposition. As Bob Metcalfe said in summary at the launch of this vision: “Once again we stand at a new beginning for the world of networking. The THIRD Network auto-orchestrates dynamic, performance-assured services and brings significant growth in the market for all stakeholders. Wouldn’t it be great to have Network as a Service personalized, virtualized and mobilized with an SLA that meets your every need? That’s the promise of the new THIRD Network.”

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The world’s second-largest telecom operator, Vodafone, facing taxation issues in India, on Thursday said it was difficult for foreign companies to do business in the country because of slower government clearances. Vodafone India Chief Executive & Managing Director Marten Pieters said the firm had in December last year sought government’s approval to bring in funds from the parent company for buying airwaves but the clearance was still awaited. “Yes, it is difficult to do business in India. That is the perception of foreign companies in general, not only telecom ones,” said, Pieters. Source

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