June is finally here and after selling out more than a million copies in one day, Apple fans around the world will be eagerly anticipating the arrival of the new gadget through their letterboxes this month. The Apple Watch has been making headlines ever since it first went on general sale in April, and whilst

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Video games play a great role in learning and education and this has been a topic of debate from years. The educators have been discussing the influences and potentials of video games in education. By playing a game, the students may learn new concepts and ideas. They can take on a different perspective with different

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Mobile phone use in India is climbing rapidly, with 26 million new connections in the first three months of 2015 added to the already existing base of 900 million mobile phone users, says a new report by Sweden-based telecom major Ericsson released on Wednesday. Close on the heels is China which added eight million new users in the same period, followed by other developing markets such as Myanmar, Indonesia and Japan. Globally, 108 million new mobile phone subscribers were added in this period and the total mobile subcriptions stands at 7.2 billion, says the report. The use of smartphones too is increasing rapidly. By 2020, it is expected that 70% of the world’s population or seven out 10 people will have a smartphone, says the report. Source

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The telecom department panel that was set up to look into the Net neutrality issue has submitted its report to Telecom Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad and the report will be made public in a few days. “Yes, they (the panel) have submitted the report to me. In few days time, the report will be put on the website, you can see and access it. I have asked the Secretary to send a copy to TRAI, so that they can also have a look at it,” Prasad said. Net neutrality implies equal treatment be accorded to all internet traffic and no priority should be given to any person or entity or company based on payment, which is seen as discriminatory. “The decision (on net neutrality) will be taken by the government and the Cabinet. The government will have the benefit of both the reports namely of my department and TRAI. I would expect that report to be expedited,” he said. Source

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Operators I see as the service providers, the OTTs and the enterprises, OTTs being the datacentre, especially the web-scale datacentre operators. And you’ll see these are fairly commonly known examples of the hot SDN use cases. But personally where I see the telcos investing are in the public and private clouds, where they want to host enterprise services, starting with elastic cloud provisioning to enable offload into their clouds. And they will either host a private cloud or host a public cloud. And they’re experimenting with this. And what I’ve seen in the rollout of SDN technology is they will start a new greenfield business with new technology to offer an enterprise-class cloud that’s technically a little bit separate from their current network. And so that’s how they’re getting experience. They’re starting small. The question of NFV is an interesting one because it starts out as a CapEx saving but it really turns into an OpEx saving. And it will eventually turn into a way of gaining new revenue. And one of the ways of doing that is to open it up to third-party offering of virtualised network functions or VNF. Now some carriers are in the leading edge of this, like NTT. Others like Verizon say I can’t even think about that possibility of opening my network up to third parties offering those services on my network. The question of DevOps and IT comes up when you start to ask who’s running the network. And it is gradually shifting from the network engineering folks to the IT folks. So as they learn from the IT side of the house how to run software, how to get services and how to have essentially a reliable end-to-end customer experience and quality of experience as opposed to a quality of box performance, they’re going to shift more to doing things in an IT fashion. And there are those that say that the central office is becoming the datacentre. Finally, telcos, service providers are investing in training of their people because they have a large engineering staff that is doing a lot of things they’re not going to need as much of. AT&T is sending 110,000 of their engineers into AT&T university, offering them short courses in everything about the new technology, focusing, as John Donovan has said, on real-time distributed software. So the datacentre web-scale operators, where are they investing? They’re investing in white box and bare metal solutions for servers we see in storage and now for networking in terms of switching and in terms of routing. And we’re actually working with some of them to build some product-type examples of that. They’re also very interested in monitoring and increasing their link utilisation and doing their own home-grown traffic engineering. The most successful deployments we’ve seen of SDN are where they are using it to do in-house traffic engineering that they can do independent of the infrastructure. They can test out new traffic engineering algorithms. They can flip a switch and turn them on and they can achieve very, very high utilisations on their network as a result of their in-house traffic engineering with an SDN underlay. Enterprises are the slowest ones to get involved in this. And where they’re still doing it in-house, not yet going to cloud, and that’s a different sort of trend, they want to automate things. They’re less concerned with the forwarding play. They want to automate especially things like firewalls. And if they can do automation and orchestration, reduce their OpEx dramatically, that’s where they’re going to see their savings. They’re not so much about creating new services because they’re an in-house operation, but they are looking to reduce their costs. And enterprise IT has always been a cost centre. Whether it will turn into a profit centre, I don’t know. But it will enable what they do to be more directly tied into the business priorities that the upper management truly is concerned about. So you’re going to see a change in the role of the CIO as a result of SDN into more of a business strategy role. So where are the vendors investing? So the first bullet is interesting. Semi-proprietary switching and routine. Everyone here is, oh, SDN is the big thing so I have to be on the bandwagon. I have to go to my customers and say, yes, I’ve got SDN solutions. But if you dig a little bit below the surface, you’ll see there’s still a lot of proprietary technology there. Some of it is necessary because there’s a lot of brownfield installations and their customers cannot change as rapidly as the technology might change. But they’re starting to introduce some of the new technologies. And there are new players. And because of the horizontal layering of networking for the first time, it’s enabled new entrants and players to come to the table with new technologies and new products that break the mould of having everything vertically integrated. It’s like the PC industry in 1981. There’s been a lot of investment in packet optical integration. The carriers love it. The optical vendors are doing a great job with this. They’re still using some of the legacy protocols through existing equipment, but they’re also putting in new OpenFlow controls down in their control plane. And in a few cases they’re taking it down to the optical element itself. A lot of vendors working purely in software, and we have networking start-ups now that don’t require $200m in venture capital to build a chipset. And they’re often in some aspect of virtualisation. There’s been a lot of success in virtualising a network, offering an overlay solutions as an easy way to get started. That’s still very popular. It is not the endgame, but it’s created many new opportunities for software companies, both existing and new. And vendors are investing their people and their money in open source projects, and I’ll say more in a moment. There’s also been an investment in hardware for software-defined networking, which is not what I expected to happen with SDN. And it’s this year the theme is hardware OpenFlow. We’ve had 1.0 OpenFlow but it had single table and it’s a little bit limited and it’s given good experience. Been a long delay in getting hardware support of multiple tables and very flexible deep packet inspection that’s now coming to the market. We’ve been involved in a lot of aspects of that. We’ll be demonstrating how you’ve got portability between OpenFlow implementations now. And it really does horizontalise the network architecture, abstracts the forwarding plane into this match action paradigm. And it gives a lot more flexibility at how you treat different flows for different revenue and business purposes of your operation. So we have a variety of silicon solutions now, starting with the traditional merchant silicon ASICs, after the customer ASICs that are dominant in the incumbents, to something new called flexible match-action ASICs. They can look really anywhere in a packet to do a match and then take the prescribed action. No penalty in price performance apparently to the fixed-function ASICs. A lot of work going on in network processing units (NPUs) and even FPGAs to do, again, deep packet inspection very easily. There’s also a lot going on in CPUs only, mostly at the edge. But if you’re going to have spine switches on top of [X], which is you need hardware processing these packets. But with SDN and the separation of forwarding and control, you can build really high-performance packet processors using a variety of technologies that bring different types of solutions to the customers with which to build best-of-breed solutions. There’s been some openness in the chipset hardware extraction layers, so the publication of their software development kits. It’s not an open source world there yet. We’re making progress. The open compute project SAI, the switch abstraction interface, is a good step in that direction. And it’s enabling us to essentially free the controllers and the applications from knowing the details of the chip hardware pipelines. Believe it or not, I didn’t think that was required, but it is. And that’s coming along. And a new world of packet programming to really tell a chipset how to configure its pipeline. Very novel stuff. And investments by venture capitalists backing chips. So open source. A lot of investment by companies. I call this the other OTT, where in this case OTT means opener than thou. Everyone is claiming we’re open. We’re more open than you are. So why is open source so popular? Well, because it’s developmentally efficient for the vendors that don’t want to develop a whole solution themselves because it’s expensive and it’s complicated for certain elements that do not require vendor differentiation. These are some examples. But the network controller space for SDN is a prominent one. It’s complicated. It’s not easy to do by yourself. And it’s better if you have a community of contributors doing it, each gives a little bit and everyone can take all of it back. Typically it gives you better-quality software. It certainly gives you faster iteration on improvements of the software and feedback from the customers who are also deploying it and contributing to it from their laboratories. And typically if there is a security flaw, it gets fixed very quickly, much faster than proprietary software ever has. And the most successful projects are ones that have a lot of community support. So there’s a whole lot of stuff in the networking world for open source software. It might make you wonder what’s left. And is there any room for innovation? Any room to make money as a vendor? There’s lots of room. And in fact, what’s left is opportunities to make a real difference for your customers instead of everybody building the same cookie-cutter infrastructure component. So I’ve given some examples here. The exciting part, of course, is the new services because that means new revenue. Some of the things I mentioned are on here. There’s plenty of opportunity for how do I now abstract the network and get a network map of it? What do I do about building an inventory of all of my components? How can I automate that? How can I turn that into a provision of network functions virtualisation, where I’ve taken stuff out of hardware appliances? I’ve virtualised it. I’ve put it together and then I’ve used that as a component of a deconstructed OSS. And finally, where is ONF investing as an organisation? We’ve been doing architecture and standards for a long time. We have gotten a lot of traction in what we’re doing in northbound interfaces, because this is where the application writers want to have some commonality. We’re coding them up. And in service chaining, well we work with ETSI and [Avit] to use SDN to facilitate service chaining, which I think is a great step, but only an intermediate temporary step before the full de-whatever of the OSS. We’ve been working with a number of major operators on how do you get there from a brownfield today to a greenfield tomorrow and to provide carrier-grade services through an SDN underlay. We’re very active investing in OpenFlow. And a lot has gone on in the packet optical integration, also in wireless and in datacentre networking and in the interoperability that has been so elusive and the portability of OpenFlow implementations and hardware. And we’re investing in open source in key places that help bring it together. Most of our little protocol projects have a coding outcome. We’re doing some selective integration of these major components. We’ll have more to say about that in about a month’s time, in June. And we’re helping to build community, working with these major investments that the other companies are making. I’ve listed them here. We have round tables with the leaders of these. Our members are working in them also. And we’re trying to bring the best solutions together for rapid deployment and experience by network operators. We’ve been accused of doing PDF-defined networking. Everything we produce is in PDF. And you can’t digest it very well. So we want more consumable artefacts from what we do. So we’re on what we call a journey from PDF to Python. Whether it’s Python or Java, I don’t really care. But how do you get stuff out there? It’s changing the world of what even networking standards are all about. By Dan Pitt Executive Director, Open Networking Foundation

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In KVH’s experience, we were so focused on niche markets offering high performance, white-gloved service for very demanding industries like high frequency trading that required ultra low latency networking, co-location services at the stock markets themselves. So serving these types of vertically focused industries with very specific and demanding requirements, you end up with very niche services. This is the complete opposite of public cloud which is meant to serve everybody with a very general requirement that applies to the majority of the market, something that a small company like KVH can’t do and something that I think for a much larger company like Colt is quite challenging to address. So the point is that public cloud is not everything. It’s something and it’s even part of the mix for these specialised niche customers that we’re serving. They have a need for the public cloud too. So the question is do we have a role in taking them to the public cloud and that’s where I say yes. So we saw that going beyond serving our enterprise customers, who had N number of datacentres — we’ve got nine datacentres in APAC, including Singapore, Hong Kong and Japan. And we saw that a few years ago, our customers kept on going to more and more datacentres. Why? Because they had trading partner in those datacentres. So to get closer to their trading partners and to do a cross-connect, they had to take down rack space and put their servers there or get hybrid private cloud environments from us at that datacentre. We then realised that in the long run, this is not efficient for the customers. It’s not in their best interests to go all over the place. We also saw them taking down a lot of public cloud resources. And the way that we saw this was customers were ordering connections from the facilities in our datacentres to get to cloud providers likeAmazon, Microsoft, IBM SoftLayer. And again we saw that this would not scale for the customers. And what the customers needed was a direct connect. They didn’t need to be in seven datacentres, they needed to be in two or three. So we’ve all heard there’s issues with getting at your cloud services via the Internet, that providing private direct connect model connectivity options was the way to go. But still the customers had the problem, they’re in too many datacentres, they have too many direct connects.So how did we solve the problem? What we saw was that instead of offering datacentre connectivity which many hardware vendors and many enterprises felt I’ve seven datacentres, I need fat pipes between all of them, I need dedicated fat pipes, well, this is still not solving the scalability problem. If they’re in one datacentre and they have five trading partners in different datacentres, how do we solve that problem? They should be able to get some kind of a virtual private network service that connects them to all their trading partners. So what we did was we created DCNet. And with DCNet we’re in Asia’s top 100 datacentres. We get the cloud providers to come in and if you’re in one datacentre that’s in DCNet you can get to all of your trading partners, all of the cloud providers. To you as an enterprise it just looks a cross-connect away. The flipside of that is that for these cloud providers, they could have virtualised pops on DCNet. So they may have one location in Japan or in Asia and if they want to create presence on DCNet, they can create a virtual pop simply by putting their service on to a network instance and putting ports at different DCs on there and then customers would see that for example as an Amazon or a Microsoft or a Google cloud service port.So the way that we tackled the problem, you know not everyone can put everything into a datacentre, even one datacentre. You still have branch offices. You still have trading partners that aren’t in your datacentre. So how do you take care of that? Really easy. You do a service mash-up. You take your DCNet and then you simply hang a tail using our typical Carrier Ethernet service and you can attach your branch office. Or if you want to, you could go straight to Amazon Direct Connect or to SoftLayer. So you can either come across this cloud connectivity network or you can still get your dedicated connection, different price points of course. Or you can mix these two together. You can blend these two connectivity services and this is where orchestration comes together. Who’s going to do the stitching? That’s where lifecycle service orchestration comes in. And that’s why I say SDN and NFV are past the leading edge, we’re at the leading edge point. Orchestration is technically — I don’t want to say it’s a lot easier, but we just don’t have as many complexities to deal with for example that SDN does, legacy network interfaces, all of this other stuff. Orchestration is going to be able to progressively rely on the SDN controllers, on the NFV managers, on the existing element network management systems. So there’s a layer of abstraction that’s going to allow orchestration to get down to business a lot of faster and with less difficulty than maybe we’re seeing with SDN and NFV. So ideally, this is how it should look. It should be an ecosystem and our enterprise customers come in and they can take down space and power in the datacentre and put their servers there and cross connect into DCNet. Or they can get hybrid private cloud services from us in one of our datacentres, get a cross connect there on DCNet. Once they’re on DCNet, they can reach everybody that’s on DCNet. Today Amazon, Azure and SoftLayer. We’re also going to be bringing in other cloud providers. I’m not saying these are cloud providers that we’re currently partnering with, but good example, the big names, salesforce.com and all of these other applications putting them on to DCNet is going to allow the enterprise customers to jump in and connect to their cloud services. Now one of the things that we can do beyond just offering this connectivity and where orchestration comes in, DCNet should not really just stop at our physical port that then attaches to Amazon. The customer is getting a VPC and they have a virtual switch inside there and a virtual router. With orchestration, today we call the Amazon APIs to provision a direct connect service and hook it up to the customer’s VPC. But we can do more. We could configure the network environment inside the customer’s instance. This would guarantee that the experience is appropriate, that it matches the SLAs of their DCNet service, match all the way up to their virtual router inside Amazon Web Services. And that’s just a few API calls away. You can then take it even further. What if we inventory the services and the price catalogue from Amazon, SoftLayer and everyone else? Then we can really startdoing service brokering and we can look at their network consumption, look at their compute, look at their application utilization and say you know, SoftLayer is having a promotion; you could move X amount of compute over here and you could save on your connectivity and you could save on something else. So as we put orchestration into the mix with the right kind of cloud connectivity service between DCs and DC players, for the service provider it enables becoming a vey new kind of systems integrator when you have orchestration tying everything together. So just quickly today the way that it looks, very heavily deployed in Tokyo, Osaka, Hong Kong and Singapore. Specifically in Hong Kong and Singapore, we’re also building our own metro. So DCNet is going to be running on top of our own managed fibre [plan]. So for the customer experience, the benefit is that with DCNet they don’t need to get all these different point-to-point connections from different connectivity providers to get to their cloud service provider. One experience, they take down one port on DCNet and then there’s simple logical cross-connect away from their content provider or their cloud service provider. They can literally spin it up in minutes. That’s why the orchestration is there. If you place an order, if you don’t have Amazon Direct Connect right now, but you’re on DCNet, you go to the portal, you spin it up and minutes later it’s done. How is it done? Because the orchestration engine comes in, calls the Amazon APIs, orders it, pays for it and hooks everything up. The hooking up that happens is mapping VLAN tags. Amazon has a VLAN tag for that customer, we have a VLAN tag for the customer’s DCNet instance. That’s the hook up because Amazon is already on DCNet. So ready access, stable performance, dramatically reduced cost, usage based charging, increased security. So the usage based charging is interesting. Both etherXEN and DCNet offer a mixture of CIR, committed information rate and excess information rate. So they subscribe to CIR, it might be 10 meg or 100 meg and then they can set their level of EIR that they’re willing to burst to. So this is kind of the elastic part. So they can limit their burst and they pay for EIR on a usage basis. In the future, we’re going to be adding scheduling and calendaring. So this is where the MEF standards come in. The way that the scheduling and the calendaring is going to look is all being driven with the evolution of the MEF standard so customers will be able to schedule more bandwidth. They’ll be able to schedule changes in class of services. So maybe at night they want the class of service to change, they want a ton more bandwidth going down the cheapest route with a certain amount of latency, high latency, for back-ups. During the trading day for example, they need very little bandwidth, but it needs to be ultra low latency on the fastest route. So this kind of customer experience we’re going to be able to schedule it and allow them to add these elastic characteristics on to this service. So I touched on most of this, the difference between traditional DC and DCNet or a cloud connectivity service like DCNet. The first thing is that everything is wrapped up with one service provider, one contract. When you need to go to Amazon in the case of Amazon Direct Connect, we take care of all of that if they want to. They can also come the other way. They can order from Amazon and come through to DCNet if they wish. But the big point is one stop shop. Very fast. If you’re in a datacentre, it’s as fast as two days. If you’re not on DCNet, you need a cross-connect, two days is the typical cross-connect processing time for our datacentre partners. So if you’re in that datacentre, two days, everything else is fast. If you’re on net we’re talking about minutes or hours for things to happen. So how does this look a little bit architecturally? So we’re really looking at doing cloud federation and lifecycle orchestration. When a customer comes in, they see a portal. And underneath we have a lot of different service experiences they can go after. They can come into the KVH private cloud, the cloud, [B Centre] Amazon Web Services, SoftLayer and then Microsoft Azure which I haven’t put on here. And the big area where we’re really putting in a lot of work and it is complicated is WAN SDN which we got from Cyan. So we worked closely for years with Cyan to get their SDN controller to truly turn WAN services into a network as a service. Then we’re currently working with [CRS] to do all of the end-to-end service orchestration from inside the datacentre services and all the way across the LAN services. So the big thing that we really have running here is network as a service is DCNet and etherXEN. DCNet and etherXEN are all one platform, the modular MSP platform, all built on Cyan and this is one platform across EMEA, APAC and North America. So this has been the case for several years already. Now what we’re doing is we’re looking at trying to do true lifecycle orchestration end to end and with Cyan and with CRS, DCNet and etherXEN are just simply virtual networks sitting on top of the platform. So DCNet is just another modular MSP service that has — that’s restricted in terms of coverage to datacentres, whereas etherXEN is anywhere and everywhere. That’s our last slide, with more animation just to see a little bit of details, a lot of infrastructure that we’re using to glue the stuff together. This is kind of an interesting point. We learned a long time ago when we wanted to do SDN in the datacentre and we talked to our potential provisioning vendor and they told us they needed a couple of years to develop the blade and millions of dollars. Did I say blade? Anyway. And Arista said don’t worry about it, no problem, it’s really easy. It shouldn’t be more than a page or two of code if not less. So we took our smartest software developer who’s in the space and he said yeah, give me a week or two. He took a weekend. Everything we wanted that blade to do was done in about a page’s worth of code. So this with things like YANG and NETCONF and the ability to model network resources and the mapping to network services and then network state and actions with environments like NETCONF, it really gets a lot easier to do a lot of these things. So a lot of the legacy OSS environment from a price point is just — and timing development timing — completely irrelevant. So we don’t need open flow for this. And sometimes the interfaces are proprietary, but these proprietary interfaces can be so easy to use. We can use them now and maybe developing a standard will involve a lot of time. So there’s a lot of balance. Some of the vendors are developing tools that are consistent or based on abstract standards, but then they end up being a little bit different. You end up writing scripts for different platforms, but these are ten line scripts not a 100 pages. So a lot of things are happening in the network environment in terms of tools, development capabilities along with standards that are helping reduce resistance between integrating different platforms and products. By Gint Atkinson, Vice President, Network Strategy & Architecture, KVH Colt

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The internet has come a long way. It is something that we use every day. It is something that is a part of our lives, a part of our social as well as professional lives. So how is it that we could potentially extract more value out of the internet, make it more business ready? Everyone agrees, be it the reputed analysts such as Gartner, Ovum, as well as our private studies that we have done within TATA Communications, that enterprise is moving to the cloud and to a hybrid cloud environment. And the issues that are facing the enterprise CIOs is mostly around network security and the service-level agreements. And the evolution of the hybrid cloud, where the private data is secure and then there are applications that we want to open up to the public, is a way of life that is not going to be reversed. So we did a study with some of the CIOs in the large enterprise and other related companies. And essentially we marked them on was the expectation exceeded? Were they met or were they not met, across various parameters, across data access, improved security, revenue and, of course, the big one, which is cost-effectiveness. And what we came up was that most of them said that expectations are met but it’s not really getting exceeded, which is where everyone wants to be in terms of deploying a network solution. If we also look at the way the applications are evolving, clearly the applications are now across the private, public and the internal systems. So this is something which is, again, a given. And each of these areas today are optimised for delivering certain application parameters and certain application functionality and features, access, security and so on and so forth, which allows the companies to have a best-in-class, best-of-breed kind of applications. Now that would also mean that there is an interaction across each of these areas, be it legacy ERP going to the private cloud. We have SharePoint where we store our documents, our policies, our regulation and so on and so forth. And then a public cloud, where we’re running web hosting, payroll and so on and so forth. So we know this whole nine yards over here. So essentially what is happening is this is a mix that is constantly changing based on business needs, based on applications as they evolve, based on regulatory reasons and so on and so forth. Now, if the CIO were to be looking at what are the top concerns,clearly the concerns that are coming out are around the network performance, security,how do you keep pace with so many service providers who have very innovativeplatforms which we would like to use and adopt? And obviously that leads to many suppliers and then, of course, the number of providers that one needs to connect to. Another way of looking at it is just the way the applications are there. There is a connectivity issue which is coming up across the public cloud, the private cloud and in house. And this complexity is actually increasing with mobility. As users become mobile, as applications are moving off into BYOD, into a global workforce, work from home, work on the move, work from planes, right? There’s WiFi on the plan nowadays. The last bastion of privacy is gone. So that is adding its complexities aswell to this whole mix. So the data flows now have become very complicated, which is moving across internet, multipoint networks, across MPLS, Ethernet in the private networks, and then of course in-house and point to point, leading to sometimes traffic snarl-ups. So this is something which is going to create issues in terms of application availability, in terms of user experience, which is essentially what the CIO is looking to deliver. So there could be bottlenecks which come up and even traffic flows, complex traffic flows, etc., which create issues for the users and therefore take away from the user experience. Clearly if we look at the internet as it has become today, we can no longer say it is something for information, which is used, which has become integrated with business. So we are now saying the internet has actually become business-critical. It’s a business driver. No longer is it optional; it is a must-have. So public cloud mobility are realities, both in terms of application availability as well as in terms of being able to access those applications while on the move. So looking at it from the perspective of how is it all coming together, clearly the hybrid cloud concept is something which was earlier talked about but wasn’t really on the roadmap of most enterprise and service providers but has become a reality today. There is no getting away from the hybrid cloud. Now the hybrid cloud, while it seems simple, and of course all the analysts say that this is the way it is going to be and is going to be the new normal for the next generation, that’s what Partner says, hybrid is the new WAN, standardising hybrid WAN offerings, combining MPLS, internet, VPN and internet services are now the default WAN architecture. So it’s pretty much become the default in terms of how enterprises are deploying their connectivity solutions. So how is it that this is actually happening? So there is the legacy out way and methodology that is being followed. And some of the service providers would be looking at it like how do we deliver these critical systems? It would be potentially putting a wrapper round existing services and taking it and [veering] internet access around a legacy MPLS network. So is that the most optimum way of deploying a solution that can cut across network, cut across geographies, cut across devices,access points, information storage? So one of the things that I would urge you, one of the videos which is there on YouTube, how many of you have heard of Bob Metcalfe? Yes, I think almost everyone. So he is the inventor of the internet. And there is a wonderful video which is there on YouTube, where he talked about the Third Network. And of course, we have NetEvents anchoring that. And it’s about an eight-minute video so I don’t have the time to play it today, but I would urge you all to have a look at that video. And he talks about how the network has evolved. He talks about this Third Network, which I’ve been trying to build up to so far. So how has TATA Communications actually tried to come and create a solution which is different, which is more optimised, which is actually moving away from some of the legacy infrastructure while, of course, leveraging it, but not just repackaging it? So the way TATA Communications actually put together this network is, and we call it IZO, is it is a network enablement for wide area networks and for cloud. So what we have done is we have created a solution which is leveraging not only the TATA Communications network which is there, but also in partnership with over 20 service providers, and that number is increasing, which allow us to provide to our end customers a deterministic routing for the data over the public internet. So it is almost like delivering MPLS or Ethernet capabilities over the public internet. So it actually has the ability to deliver services, and I will cover them off very quickly. I don’t want to do too much of hard sell here, just to cover some of the solutions that are possible. And then of course we could have detailed discussions later over the coffee breaks or the lunch breaks or the meetings that are set up in the afternoon. But essentially if we look at the service offerings that are there in IZO, primarily there are three. One is the IZO Internet WAN. One is IZO Public. And one is IZO Private. And I will cover these off very quickly. Why have they been created and what are the use cases that they are actually delivering to? We go back to the earlier questions that’s on the minds of every CIO, internet performance, security, network performance, so on and so forth. So if we look at IZO Public, it is essentially a service that is available to cloud providers. It prioritises critical applications. It runs over the internet and it allows [SLE]-backed performance which is available to the users using the technologies that TATA has deployed not only on our network but in partnership with 20 other service providers. And it is available in multiple locations across the world. The IZO Internet WAN is focused towards enterprise, global enterprise, who’s operating across multiple locations, global locations, and would like to have MPLSlike performance as well as security across their various offices which are connected on internet. So it is ability to deliver the enterprise-class WAN services over the internet, leveraging not only our network but also the partner networks across the globe. And it allows not only the ability to have this performance but also it gives a very fast time to installation because it is actually using internet connection so it doesn’t require dedicated cable laying and connectivity to the office premises. IZO Private is where we allow our customers to connect through private connectivity, so it could be Ethernet MPLS connections, into TATA Communications. Now imagine, most of the enterprise customers today are using cloud services across it could be the Microsoft Azure platform, the Google Cloud platform, it could be Amazon Web Services, and sometimes it’s a combination thereof. Typically customers would have to have, if they wanted dedicated, secure access, they would have to have the connectivity almost last mile to the cloud provider. What TATA Communications has done is that we’ve, in partnership with Amazon through the Direct Connect program, Microsoft through the ExpressRoute program, we have connected the last mile into all of these service providers. And then we have the connectivity that we can provide to our enterprise customers, who then, with a single connection, can access multiple cloud services providers in a secure and highly performance-oriented way. So that is something which we offer in the IZO Private. So essentially, if we look at private connectivity to datacentres, we mentioned about the key cloud service providers, but nothing stops, of course, to also connect other datacentres that enterprise may be using and accessing. So it allows connectivity across multiple locations where we have datacentres of our own as well as of our partners already connected. And then essentially what it does is it allows us to provide a predictable simplified access, which is seamless and secure, to these cloud service providers. What earlier would have required multiple relationships, multiple connections and connectivity and a lot of complexity in terms of setting it up in order to access multiple solutions and service providers in a seamless way. So essentially what we say, and this is a bit of the marketing jargon, is the win-win man, everybody’s network cloud and basically how you can leverage a single service provider for the cloud ecosystem across the public/private internet WAN. And it allows enterprise and service providers to use the network to reach more cloud providers across multiple locations, of course faster deployments and better cost performance. What are the kind of applications that are typically the use cases? If we look at email and streaming video, enterprise applications, then those are less latency issues. So if you have a little bit of latency, it obviously doesn’t matter on email if it comes in a few seconds. But if there’s real-time video collaboration over virtual desktop, then it does matter. So with these solutions, what we have done is the IZO Internet WAN is actually able to take these use cases and deliver a seamless experience for the end user and for the enterprise across these using the technologies that I just described. So just a little bit about some of the partnerships that are there in place. I talked about most of them so I won’t spend much time on this slide. In terms of the service coverage, it is right now available in 34 countries and 500 cities and we’re looking at increasing this footprint dramatically over this year and next year. And some interesting statistics in terms of the initial rollout, it covers almost 85% of the world’s GDP. So that’s an important statistic for enterprise. We want to reach out to customers and 80% of the world population. And we plan to extend to about 100 countries by the end of next year. This is a little bit about TATA Communications. We’re a tier-one ISP service provider. We have created more than 50 datacentres, over 200 POPs and 500 ISP customers and a huge number of petabytes travel across the network, which is essentially almost 24% of the global internet routing is over our network. So that’s the scale of operations that we have, backed by a passion for our customers. So most of our customers, 82%, and it’s almost all, they’re very satisfied or extremely satisfied with the experience that they have with us. And if we look at the type of security measures that we have deployed in our network, it allows us to have 0% spam, phishing and malware, so that’s, I think, something commendable. And customer satisfaction is much higher than the industry average. So when we presented this at launch, the analysts had some good things to say about the IZO platform. So they’re up here so I’m not going to read it out. But essentially we had Joel Stradling from Current Analysis and Nav from IDC talk about the solution. And that was very, very positive things they had to say. So to wrap up the presentation, the question is are you ready to deploy the Third Network, to build your network cloud? And we are ready with a solution available from TATA Communications, in partnership with service providers and cloudproviders. By Amit Sinha Roy, Vice President, TATA Communications

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Tata Communications, a leading provider of A New World of Communications announces its brand new video network partnership with China Telecom Global to enable and manage media content for customers in China and globally. This partnership leverages China Telecom Global’s regional expertise and leadership and Tata Communications’ Global Video Network to ensure a compelling service offering to their customers. The partnership, which began with the successful delivery of the 2015 World Figure Skating Championship from Shanghai to Japan, enables China Telecom Global to leverage the global reach, quality and reliability of Tata Communications’ Global Video Network to offer unparalleled reach for all their live sporting events in China. Mr. Pengcheng Fan, Vice President, Product Development, China Telecom Global, says, “Mobile video consumption is growing at an exponential rate with a robust growth trajectory expected in the next five years. Through our new video network partnership, China Telecom Global can provide seamless connectivity for our media and entertainment customers across China. The partnership is defined by connectivity to key global destinations, premium quality and industry leading SLAs. We are excited about this partnership as it helps to further differentiate our service offerings in the market.” Reports state that Mobile Video will generate more than 69 percent of Mobile Data traffic by 2019[1]. To ensure that its customers have the absolute in leading edge technology, Tata Communications recently launched the new Media Ecosystem which combines traditional video contribution services with IP-based connectivity. The ecosystem enables seamless management of content as a cloud-based managed service and supports global media distribution requirements, OTT and mobility applications. This platform provides customers with flexibility and intelligence, allowing customers to experiment with new formats and to launch new services and channels at the touch of a button. Brian Morris, Vice President & General Manager, Global Media & Entertainment services, Tata Communications says, “Tata Communications is dedicated to offering its media customers access to key media hotspots for the distribution of premium broadcast quality content across the globe. This partnership with China Telecom Global is a natural step in that direction and marks the expansion of Tata Communications’ Global Video Network reach into China. We are excited to leverage China Telecom Global’s video network in China and to offer our customers access to this key region, connecting broadcasters, media and entertainment providers, news bureaus and service providers across the globe.” Tata Communications delivers world-class connectivity backed by the company’s leading global fibre network. Its Video Network covers more than 300 media hotspots in 125 cities globally. Today, over 24% of the world’s Internet routes travel over Tata Communications’ network and the company is the only Tier-1 provider that is in the top five by routes in five continents. The network inter-connect between Tata Communications and China Telecom Global is located in Hong Kong.

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Spirent’s cloud device intelligence service now available to US MVNOs through Service Agreement with Prepaid Wireless Wholesale; Ready Wireless first to sign up. Spirent Communications’ device intelligence solution Tweakker has been selected by Prepaid Wireless Wholesale (PWW), North America’s largest mobile virtual network enabler /aggregator (MVNE/MVNA). The MVNE/MVNA is offering Tweakker’s device intelligence cloud service to many US-based mobile virtual network operators (MVNOs), with Ready Wireless being the first to sign up. Like all MVNOs world-wide, the challenge facing these carriers is that devices all have different instructions for programming Data and MMS. With Tweakker’s cloud device intelligence solution, connectivity issues for Data and MMS are a thing of the past. When it comes to smartphones, it takes on average three calls costing on average $45 per user to get them on line and to start generating data revenues from use of social media such as Facebook and Instagram. As a result, out of the box APN configuration has become a mission-critical requirement for any MVNO and for any MVNE/MVNA platform. Through PWW’s partnership with Tweakker, the firm can solve its MVNOs any APN issue. Tweakker’s device intelligence cloud service that analyzes and configures all handset models from known and unknown handset manufacturers is unmatched in today’s carrier market. Brandt Mensh, PWW’s President comments: “At PWW, we are continuously working on new, industry leading products to help our MVNOs succeed in the marketplace. The Tweakker program will expedite handsets to the marketplace, and increase ARPU as Data adoption will increase.” Dennis Juul Poulsen, general manager of Spirent Tweakker, comments: “By partnering with PWW, Spirent Tweakker has the potential to rapidly grow its MVNO footprint in America to at least 800,000 device users. We expect that user base to grow significantly.” Simply put, Spirent Tweakker enables MVNOs to build brand confidence and better profit from average revenues per user (ARPU). With Tweakker, MVNO’s have no upfront costs; only a monthly fee is charged based on user connectivity numbers. The Tweakker Device Intelligence Cloud solution uses highly accurate device intelligence data trusted by over 100 carriers. Accurate device data is particularly important in the MVNO segment because many customers bring their own devices into the MVNO’s network (BYOD). Spirent is the only Device Intelligence vendor on the market that runs a daily proven in-house verification program for device data, device settings and analytics. Each day, all Spirent’s 100 plus operator customers are provided new verified data, while other device management vendors offer only monthly updates, with hot updates on separate order.

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UIH Group is turning a new page in the broadband industry. Through collaboration with its strategic partners, the conglomerate now offers the Cloud NextGen. Unveiled at the “UIH, We serve you more” event, this innovation promises to give organizational customers great value for money, IT security plus a lower cost. All these benefits respond well to not just Thailand’s but also the world’s economic climate. Vichai Bencharongkul, Executive Chairman, United Information Highway (UIH) Company Limited, reveals that the launch of Cloud NextGen has marked UIH’s step into the new chapter of the increasingly advanced broadband communications. This innovation, after all, is clearly differentiated from other available service options in the Thai market. UIH’s Cloud Next Gen provides a comprehensive solution as it covers three crucial parts: 1) Smart network or broadband network to facilitate high-speed communications 2) IT-infrastructure security 3) Cloud service. With solid expertise in all these three fields, UIH is more than ready to provide world-class services to its customers. By MEF Metro Ethernet Forum standard, UIH is Thailand’s only Certified MEF CE 2.0 Service Provider. “We are confident that we are well on our path to become the Asean’s leading cloud service provider.” Mr. Vichai says. Colonel Ruangsub Kovindha, managing director of UIH, says UIH and subsidiaries have focused on delivering network-service quality, IT security, and convenient access to communications in all areas their organizational customers are based. This delivery applies even when customers have operated local/overseas branches. According to Colonel Ruangsub, UIH has now added value to broadband service through its Cloud development. The fresh perspective, practical advice, and comprehensive services provided by UIH answer well to customers’ needs. With UIH, customers can be rest assured that infrastructure installations are not only specifically catered to their requirements but also cost effective. Sunti Medhavikul, a senior deputy managing director of UIH, says business organizations now need to compete on management efficiency. Recognizing such need and having full understanding of the business environment, UIH has decided to introduce the “Next Generation One Stop Service Solution”. It is a new and efficient way to network communications covering five main types of cloud services through UIH’s perfect smart broadband network 1) Cloud VPN, 2) Cloud Internet, 3) Cloud WiFi, 4) Cloud Protection, 5) Cloud HM. “UIH, we serve you more” event hold on 7 May 2015 at Centara Grand at Central Plaza Ladprao to present the huge potential and leadership of UIH Group and its 12 strategic partners namely Huawei, DTAC, PCCW Global, HP Enterprise Security, FireEye, Juniper, Palo, Alto, Ruckus, a subsidiary of i-secure, Cloud HM and INN .All such partners are prominent players in the technology industry. The event stages the UIH Group’s “Showcase: Next Generation Cloud Service”, which highlight cool concepts as well as innovative services.

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