Gionee Pioneer P4 is the new buzz in the mobile market. This new Smartphone is now available on Infibeam. This Smartphones come embedded with many new features. This new phone comes with latest Android, powerful processor and huge scree to make your experience a new one. This new pocket friendly phone will be available with Infibeam for INR 8,950 only and you an order it now from www.infibeam.com. This phone has a 4.5 inch Capacitive Touch Screen that has a display resolution of 854×480 pixels. See images with better display quality. Based on Android 4.2 Jelly Bean OS and powered by 1.3 GHz Quad Core processor is what makes the phone smarter than others. It gives you awesome speed and performance. It has various connectivity options that let you connect to your virtual world like Wi-Fi and GPS and you can easily share or transfer files with USB and Bluetooth. Capturing moments for life time store can be done with the 5MP rear camera it comes with 4X Digital Zoom. It also has a 2MP front camera that lets you take selfies and make video calls whenever you want. Store all you want in the 8GB internal Memory space and expand it up to 32GB. It also features 1GB RAM for better performance. It runs on 1800mAh Polymer Battery that gives you 11 hours of talk time and 386 hours of standby time. To know more about the features you can visit: http://www.infibeam.com/Mobiles/gionee-pioneer-p4/P-mobi-30419618344-cat-z.html Key Features     4.5 inch Capacitive Touch Screen     1.3 GHz Quad Core processor     Wi-Fi and GPS     5MP rear camera     2MP front camera     8GB Internal Memory     1GB RAM     1800mAh Polymer Battery

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Just got this offer from Airtel Delhi postpaid connection via sms. Rental they are charging for this is whopping Rs.149 per month. Good for them. Vodafone, Reliance, Aircel, Mtnl are other gsm operators which offers free unlimited onnet calling to one or all numbers. I am not sure of Idea Cellular but may be they also offer it to its customer from time to time.

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Samsung recently announced to launch it Gear Series and it is available on Infibeam.com. Infibeam houses the latest Samsung Smart Watch Gear 2, Gear 2 Neo and Gear Fit. These come loaded with the best features that make your communication better and smarter than before. These are now available on Infibeam, and you can order Samsung Smart Watch Gear 2 for INR 21,500/- while Gear 2 Neo and Gear Fit can be ordered for INR 15,450/-. You can book them now from www.infibeam.com. The new Samsung Smart Watch Gear 2 is the perfect smart watch that you can easily connect to your Smartphone and stay at ease. Don’t miss any call or message you can read the messages and see the incoming calls on the 1.63 inches Super AMOLED screen with the Smart Notification feature. It is Dust and Water Resistant as it comes with IP67 certification. So you can go wherever you want. It also has changeable straps that gives it vibrant and elegant look. It also has inbuilt 2MP camera, Heart Rate Sensor, Pedometer, S Health, Standalone Music Player, and lot more to make your experience a fun filled one. Samsung Smart Watch Gear 2 Neo also allows you to make and receive call. You can read your messages on the 1.63 inched AMOLED Screen. You can receive instant notification that notifies you about the apps and updates on the phone. This Smart Watch is Dust and Water Resistant as it is IP67 certified. Change easily to vibrant and elegant color straps. Use your personalized fitness motivator to keep track of your health. Listen to music on the go with the Standalone Music Player in it. It is compatible with many Galaxy Smartphones and tablets. Samsung Gear Fit is a personalized fitness motivator and has a heart rate sensor in it. This device is Compatible with many Galaxy Smartphones and Tablets. You can also stay connected with your devices with many third party apps. You get notified immediately on this about the emails, messages, incoming calls and the 3rd party apps that help to keep you connected to the device on the 1.84 inch super AMILED screen. This is also dust and water resistant. Wear this device 24×7 and stay updated always. To know more about These Smart devices you can visit – http://www.infibeam.com/Mobiles/samsung-offers-a.html To know more about Samsung Gear 2 Neo you can visit – http://www.infibeam.com/Mobiles/samsung-smart-watch-gear-2-neo/P-mobi-42758239821-cat-z.html

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Mtnl Delhi plans are stuck to two years old 512kbps minimum while Mumbai counterpart has minimum 1mbps plans. Similarly other plans with fair usage policy have around 80% to 100% Fair usage cap difference. Why can’t both city have almost similar tariff plans. Why mtnl Delhi is trying to rip off its user more than Mumbai mtnl.

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Entry to Indian market is going to be tougher for foreign telecom companies. The Government has proposed to make security clearances mandatory for foreign telecom companies, irrespective of how much equity they hold. At present, foreign telecom companies do not require security clearances for entering India with up to 49% equity holding, and they only require security vetting beyond 49% equity holding which is cleared by the Foreign Investment Promotion Board (FIPB). The security clearance is given by the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA). The Department of Telecommunications (DoT) members are scheduled to meet on Thursday to discuss the recommendations of the Committee of Secretaries on the issue. Source

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Reliance Industries Ltd’s telecommunications unit has agreed to use Reliance Communications Ltd’s intra-city fibre network to roll out 4G services, in what is the third infrastructure-sharing agreement between the two companies. Reliance Communications, controlled by billionaire Anil Ambani, said on Monday a master services agreement signed was based on “arm’s length pricing at prevailing market prices”. Reliance Industries is controlled by India’s richest man Mukesh Ambani, and its telecommunications unit Reliance Jio Infocomm Ltd is the only company to have nationwide 4G permits. The company has yet to start commercial services. Source

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Viom Networks, the Indian telecom infrastructure group, is set for some fundraising once the elections are over and markets settle. The company, majority owned by Tata Teleservices, could become one of the first Indian groups to take advantage of new regulations and do an IPO overseas. Beyondbrics spoke to chief executive, Syed Safawi, and found out why Viom needs growth capital. The answer lies in some rare optimism around the Indian economy and the beleaguered telecoms sector in particular. Source

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Telcos have is they own networks, right. They own networks and cloud is inherently a network-based solution or approach. Cloud is changing everything for a lot of players. This is just an illustration of the kinds of companies that are hoping to drive cloud in their direction or to meet the demand coming from their business customers in the cloud way. It’s all over the map. The striking thing and the point I’m going to make on this slide is if you look at telcos they’re just one of many types of companies trying to address this problem or that need to address this problem. In the past, telcos had their own world, communication services. Basically the world will buy what we decide to give them. That’s the world they operated in. In the world of cloud, in their new business they need to address, that is definitely not the case. They’re just one of the players. So in terms of business services or IT services, if you look at it generally and from a historical perspective, what cloud proposes in terms of enabling businesses of all sizes to re-architect the way they deliver applications within their environments, it’s changing everything. It’s hugely disruptive. And the point of this – you may not be able to read the words or see the numbers – we did a survey. This is the second iteration we’ve done and we’re doing a third this year, polling about 700 enterprises around the world from every region of the world. And we asked them a bunch of things about cloud adoption, but one of them was supplier preference. Who are you using today or plan to use in the next 12 months, narrowing it to infrastructure as a service and platform as a service, realising that SaaS is not something they’re going to – they tend to go with the software companies for that. And what it revealed was exactly what you just echoed in your hand-raising about network operators being cloud service providers is they hardly even register. Okay? If you think about who they turn to today or plan to turn to, it’s – well, telecom operators are 4% infrastructure as a service, 2% for platform as a service compared to the other types of suppliers. And these are people with budget. We only talk to people with budget by the way. So I expect that this is trending upwards. As the applications that businesses move to the cloud become more sophisticated, more mission-critical, the value of telcos will rise and I think this year’s results will be higher. But still you can see the problem. It’s clearly illustrated there. So in terms of advice we’re giving to operators in terms of what to look for and how to change this and move forward, you know one of the things about infrastructure as a service is a big opportunity for them, they have to understand is that most large enterprises are still using cloud as a tactical resource. It’s not strategic. So when it becomes more strategic, that’s when I think the opportunity becomes more relevant to telcos and their advantage. Emerging markets is somewhere that operators are looking to make business. That has its own problems. The near term opportunity I think is for mid-sized businesses and cloud natives, if you will, and those with webcentric apps. These are the companies that are spending money on mission-critical cloud applications and there are opportunities for operators or service providers of all sorts including telcos. And then we believe the mid market is underserved and is an opportunity as well to go after. We’re also seeing a lot of impatience. A lot of operators are saying, look we’ve got to move fast, we need it fast. So we’re seeing a lot of market activity. We have over the past couple of years; we are going to see more in terms of actual mergers and actual buyouts. Finally, what do enterprises care about? Again from the same series of surveys that we do. Someone mentioned today – it’s the truism – security is number one. Price is important. Availability is the third most important thing. Now if you look at this and you think wow, network-owning operators really should have an advantage. Last point I want to make and these are recommendations to network-owning operators. This is actually stripped straight from a presentation we gave last week to one of the biggest network operators in the world. The first thing is to avoid the Amazon trap. You can’t do what Amazon does, nor should you. The pricing isn’t right. The profit margin won’t be there. Operator strength comes from network expertise. The highlight that what you’re offering is built on that backbone and play to their strengths. Finally, the security issue. Again you know the emphasis on threat management is an opportunity for operators and really focusing on that because that is a unique advantage. By Jeremiah Caron, Senior Vice President, Analysis, Current Analysis

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All clouds are not created equal, and telco clouds have unique capacity, latency and scale requirements. Large telecom operators have “the right stuff” to be a significant force in multi-tenant cloud services. Driving telco cloud futures is evolving technology – but this is coupled with unique challenges telcos face due to their inherent nature. I think one challenge in a telco environment is time to market, or time to service, to introduce new services in the network. Not that straightforward, not that easy. A lot of large operators have very well thought through processes of introducing a service and getting it operational. One of the reasons it takes some time is because they want to do it the first time right. It’s a little bit a different approach than a Google or another company that does beta and people now that it may not work, it may have a bug, it may crash in the browser window and you yet it to reload your browser. A telco obviously have a different mindset in this, so I think they want to go and get it first time right, which is part of the agility aspect and as part of that, the service provider needs to continue to have an evolution in their product portfolio and need to continue to do that while hitting the quality I just mentioned. Then, of course, they are dealing with over-the-top threats out there. Companies that are offering services they are offering. Think of WhatsApp, messaging, think of Voice over IP like Skype etc. that are directly competing with their revenue sources. Then I think finally, the network to cloud connectivity, as I mentioned earlier, service providers are very good in understanding how to build networks, but cloud is a different beast. It has different applications, different implications to the type of people you need, the type of thinking you need to have in your organisation . I think the last challenge is probably the biggest is the OSS agility. For a service provider to introduce new technology in their network it can take quite a bit of time not only because they want to get it first time right, but because it has to be part of a more complex billing environment that attracts the subscriber, what they’re using, how they’re using the network etc. If you do some comparison between cloud and telco, a couple of things. Just three metrics that we think are important. One is from an operating expense perspective. We know that if you look at the cloud guys, they have one admin for 15,000 servers and then if you look at a telco view, they have one engineer per 100 type of systems. So, complete different approach. Completely different way of how you think and how you manage your network. If you think about how much time it can take for a cloud provider to introduce a new service, it is instantaneously and often what they do is start running a new software load and start moving users onto that new load, couple and then just keep on increasing and if it works well they move everybody over. If it doesn’t, then go back and revert to the old version of code. It can take a telco six, seven months easily to introduce a new service in their network. Then basically, the other thing is that if you look at the type of offerings they have, a service provider has been around for while. You guys probably saw that BT announced not too long ago that they were going to shut down the TDM connections, as an example. I mean there is networks out there that have been built in the ’70s and the ’80s that are sometimes still operational. X25 and frame relay. So, they have a large legacy to worry about and a lot of different offerings and just telling their customers to go to IP is not always that straightforward, that easy. Then cloud, of, has not been that long around and they have a different business model to operate in this. So, if you kind of look at a telco and how they build their network, I think it’s very evident that cloud technology will go in these networks. Unlike cloud providers in the world that have a couple of datacentres in the world, I think what you will see in a telco environment is you’ll see a lot more datacentres. Smaller. You’ll have a few larger ones, central, but they will look at bringing compute resources and storage resources as close as possible to the actual user. There is a few reasons why you want to do that. One is there are certain services that have a latency dependency, or have a dependency to be close to the infrastructure. If you are a multi-country operator, then in some cases there are regulations. There is countries that say, “Your billing information about your user cannot leave the borders of the country”. So, that means, let’s say if you’re in Europe and you are operating in four or five different countries, you may have to run four or five datacentres and store information of that user in that specific country. So, that’s another reason. And, of course, these networks are quite big. I mean if you look at a typical wireless network, or mobile network, they’re huge. So, there is obviously the scale aspect of how many users and how many base stations or whatever you’re supporting from a cloud based resource. So, we’re seeing definitely that networks are being much more hybrid and compute, storage resource becomes more and more integrated and more and more pushed out to the edge of the network. So, then let’s talk a little bit about where telco cloud, these datacentres I mentioned earlier, where they are similar to IT cloud and where they’re not similar to IT cloud. If you look at it, a telecom operator that decides to take their infrastructure and virtualise it as part of NFE and we call it simply layer four to layer seven, but there is a lot of stuff in those two words, they have to worry about a few things. First and foremost is if I take, for instance, a signalling application, a voice signalling server, that product was probably built many years ago. It was built on hardware. It was proprietarily integrated and it was never built day one to be virtualised. So, when you start virtualising a piece of software that was not day one to be in a scale out type of architecture, there are implications to that. There are implications on connectivity to that type of server. There are implications in terms of you can spin them up, you can spin them down, but how they work with the rest of the network, you have to think about that. So, there is elements of that that have to be considered. The other thing is if these applications go down, the network goes down and I think that’s a fundamental aspect for service providers to think about that. If the service cloud goes down, sure, the application is down, is bad. Don’t get me wrong, if salesforce.com would be down, a lot of people could not do what they need to do. But if the network goes down, all the applications are down. It’s only one. All of them are down. So, therefore, the requirements that people put on telco cloud are different in terms of resiliency, in terms of scaling it, in terms of stability etc. So, those are fundamental discussions that we’re having with customers where they say, “We love cloud, we love open architecture, we love the cost focus that we can get the cost efficiencies out of it, but at the same time I still need to run a network and my customers still expect it to be up”. When you ask average users when you are doing Gmail and it doesn’t work for whatever reason, you blame the network, you blame maybe Google or whatever, but it’s not a painful point. But, if your service goes down, your mobile service, you immediately notice that and you go I’m paying a lot of money for this service and I’m not able to use it right now and that is a problem by itself that service providers have to think about. So, when you look at that and this is a diagram that tries to quantify that, there is different dimensions that you can look at when you build a cloud. You look at your latency, you look at the type of transactions that you have, you look at the throughput that you want to drive in and out of a certain datacentre, the availability and in green, this is where IT enterprise type of managers look at. This is what they will qualify and go like, okay, I want to put some of my servers in a public cloud, how do these things matter to me and this where the green focus area is. The white triangle just shows where the telco looks at and they look at extreme availability. They look at extreme very short latency. They look at throughput being very, very high. So, these are all elements that again are different in that sense. Don’t get me wrong, the building blocks are still the same. You still have compute, network and storage, but the way you put these building blocks together changes because of these requirements and it’s not always just cheap. It is cheap, but needing these requirements here. So, I think if you look at the whole trend and what we’ve been seeing with virtualisation, we started in the ’90s where we had networking, applications built straight on the hardware, the proprietary way of doing things as we discussed earlier today. Of course, with virtualisation you get significant CapEx benefits. You get efficiency gains where you can take applications, networking or server, or any other area that takes advantage of a hypervisor type of function or virtualisation, you can sweat your asset, basically. Get efficiency out of whatever you buy and that has worked really well in companies like VMware have done really great on this trend and it has really allowed to break the cost curve as you expand your compute resources but make them also more efficient in the process. In our opinion, the next step is all about automation. Not necessarily only virtualisation. Virtualisation is part of it, but automation really comes down to how can I reduce the OpEx of my network and how I run my network. The discussions that we’re having is not only is my telco cloud highly available, but how can I make it more automated, how can I make it set up in such a way that it gives me all the virtualisation benefits but it also gives me all the operational benefits that we kind of discussed earlier as part of the key challenges that service providers have. I think this is a way for us how we are looking at it. Also, from a Juniper perspective, we are focused really on that blue block. What can we do there? What are the different elements, what are the different components that are needed in order to solve this pretty important problem for our customers? So, the way, and I mentioned this also earlier in the panel, what we need to do is the network needs to become more responsive to the application. A lot of discussion has been about, okay, I have an application that wants to do something with the network, I spin up VM so I do something and it goes and talks to the network. But what is very, very important in this is we also need to get information back from the network into the application. This has been an area where we’ve been really spending a lot of effort on both from a development perspective as well as from a product and customer engagement perspective where basically we go in and we do the resource orchestration. You basically get your virtualised network infrastructure through that. You’re able to make the network more agile. Once you are doing this network service orchestration it becomes also very important to pullback the information out of the network into some kind of a controller or layer that exposes that information to applications that need that information. One way to look at this is we talk a lot about APIs. We talk a lot about protocols. What we think is more important is how you define these objects. We’re talking about a multitude of different information elements and you need to define these objects. What is the information in them, how you version them because you may have version 1 on the object that has these counters or these statistics but version 2 needs to be interoperable with version 1. It’s not only about the interfaces and the protocols, but it’s very important to think also about the actual objects themselves and the data models as we call it. That data model is extremely important for us and that’s a big part of what we’re spending time on. You need to imagine that if you’re starting to pull information out of the network, we have a network that operates at terabytes of performance and obviously I could mirror every packet that goes over that and analyse it somewhere, but then I’m going to mirror terabytes of traffic to some central place which will not work. So, then it comes down to how can you go in and create the right ratio of extracting information and exposing that in a real time fashion to these applications in a scalable and cost effective manner. There has been protocols around like NetFlow etc., but we’re talking about much more than that. We’re talking really about an ability for an application to be able to start to see hey, I have a database and that is being queried by some kind of application and you can actually start to predict that there is a service degradation happening. Something is going wrong. Or, at certain times, at peak times you start seeing some latency differences, so you can start to actually proactively tell the application to start spinning up more VM somewhere else or figure out how to respond to the network environment. So, this is an important part of what we’ve been spending a lot of time on, creating that full circle. So, a couple of things about how we, from a Juniper perspective, look at the different layers. You have, of course, the network layer that we need to virtualise. It has to completely interoperate with any type of physical network. We think that is very important. You establish your virtual network services on top of this layer. So, think of your firewalls or think of whatever the type of services that are virtualised. Then on top of that we want to create this ability for network programmability. Federation is important. We don’t believe there is going to be a single controller managing the whole internet. It will be a bunch of controllers, less than the number of nodes of router, or physical elements, but they will be there and they will talk east west to each other. So, we think as one other part of what we’ve been very busy on and talking with customers about is not only north-south traffic, but is also not about north south signalling either. It’s also about east west. How can you have these controllers exchange state information between each other to create the global experience that you know today from the internet where you can browse any website anywhere else? Then you put all the other [mason] and analytics capabilities on top of that. So, we’ve actually adopted high-end databases to store all this analytics information so we are able to quickly query, quickly run reports etc. on top of that. I think one way we talk about this is we talk about SDN as a compiler. What we mean with that is for the ones who remember the days, in the old days you had a microprocessor and you would have to go in and programme it in assembly. Now, I don’t know if you’ve ever done assembly, but it is a lot of work and actually, the rule of thumb is for every source line you can see there is 10 instructions you have to do in assembly. Now, there is people that still do it for fun, but nobody today in their mind will go and build an application in assembly because, first of all, it will be processor dependent. So, basically, you lock yourself into Intel or Arm or any other vendor. The second it’s very resource intensive, very hard to debug and very easy to make a lot of mistakes in there. So, then smart people came together and said well, this is not going to work for us. We need to come up with a new way. Let’s come up with abstract programming languages. Let’s come up with C and Pascal and whatever, Java, and let’s just use that, expose that to more broader people to be able to programme. Then a compiler goes in and actually compiles that to the assembly language for the right processor for the right architecture. We’re trying to do the exact same thing on networking. We’re trying to be able to go back to primitives that any person can understand. A VM is part of a group. A group of VMs is allowed to talk to that group of VMs, but not to this group of VMs or to that user on the mobile phone or not to that type of physical access DSL or whatever. So, we’re trying to bring it back to policies and abstract language. Then what we’re trying to do is use this architecture to go in and actually compile it to actually true configuration on routers, switches, firewalls, whatever you may have. In an ideal world, a customer should not care any more about the CLI of the box that is running there. Actually, we’re running a programme internally we call No CLI. We’re telling our engineers think about a world where the network will not be programmed by CLI any more. Like, today, we have a world where nobody programmes in assembly any more and that’s kind of the bigger view and the bigger picture. That’s why APIs are part it. Data models and objects are part of it. But, it really comes down to this vision of thinking completely out of the box in a different way about how we look at networking and fundamentally change the way we run, build networks. So, part of that is a product that we have that is called Contrail and I mentioned this earlier as part of the openness debate. We actually took a decision to take this software and make it open source. So, it’s downloadable. It’s been downloaded quite a bit of time and it’s basically the full controller and it is distributed and licensed that people can do any modifications to it and do whatever they want to do with it. What we do then is in a typical red hat style is we work with customers that want us to maybe customise it to their needs because like a compiler there is different programming languages and like customers, they will also have different ways of how they want to run their network and what they expect out of it. So, it is our job to tailor the compiler to the abstraction level that they want to use. Some want to be very high level. Some want to have a little bit more detail in the way they programme and talk to the network. This software is available for free, downloadable and it has been for us also a great experience because we get a lot of feedback now. We get feedback from students in universities. They’re telling us, “Hey, have you thought about doing it this way, or have you thought about that?” So, actually, it’s been a very, very great learning experience for us to do the open sourcing of our controller Contrail. So, having said that, my last few takeaway points that I want leave you guys with behind, I think networking has never been so challenged as it is today, but it has never been that much fun I think as well. I think Martin also mentioned this earlier, or it was mentioned in the interview with Martin. It is changing really rapidly how we think of networking. Even for people like myself that have been networking for over 15 years, you’re learning every day new stuff because you’re now suddenly exposed to complete new ways of how you solve certain problems. There is a true transformational need at service providers and what we’re trying to do is we’re trying to partner with them, or trying to help them with that transformation of going to the world that I just showed you earlier of this programmability, this automation, this application that talks to the network like it’s talking to another type of application. I think a lot of white box discussions seem to revolve around CapEx. It’s important, of course. We need to make sure that the cost curve per gig or whatever the metric you want to use that it does not follow the traffic pattern. So, there is no discussion on that. But I think the real savings are on OpEx and I think this is the area that as an industry we need to probably think and spend more time on saying how can we make these networks highly efficient, highly scalable and make sure that they run at a lower cost basically. Then for us that comes down to this automation vision, the scale vision and ability to create new services. By Said Ouissal, VP, Product Portfolio Management, Juniper Networks

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Infinera, provider of Intelligent Transport Networks, announced that Infonetics Research, an international market research and consulting firm serving the communications industry since 1990, has ranked Infinera as the top optical vendorin its latest scorecard.In the report, Infonetics said, “Infinera is #1 this year as a result of very high ratings among customers for technology innovation, reliability, and service and support.” Infonetics’2014Optical Network Hardware Vendor Scorecardprofiles, analyzes and ranks the 10 largest global vendors of optical transport equipment. Vendors were evaluated based on sevenmetrics including market share, market share momentum, financial stability, packet-optical intensity, technology innovation, product reliability, and service and support.In the report, Infinera emerges as the number one ranking optical transport equipment provider worldwide. “The market for optical transport equipment is $12 billion annually, nearly as large as and growing faster than the market for service provider routers and switches. Infinera emerged asthe highest scoring company in our optical vendor leadership scorecard,” said Andrew Schmitt, Principal Analyst, Optical, Infonetics Research.“When we ask service providerswhat Infinera does wellthey mention technology innovation, ease ofoperation,high reliability and leading services and support.” “The Infonetics optical vendor scorecard shows that Infinera’s focus on building Intelligent Transport Networks is resonating with global network operators,” said Tom Fallon, Infinera CEO. “In 2013, we grew our market share by enabling service providers to use time as a competitive weapon to deliver services faster while simultaneously scaling their multi-terabit networks and lowering costs. We believe we are at the beginning of a once-in-a-decade transition to 100G and beyondand we are honored to see our focus on technology innovation and helping our customers win in their markets reflected in the outstanding results for Infinera in the Infonetics scorecard.”

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