Native app UI design does not allow designers enough room to play around. Designing for smaller screens is a tough ask since the users have short attention spans. The UI design needs to be worked around in an interface that’s easy enough for the newbies but should not put off the experienced users too. #1.

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Bharti Airtel, India’s largest telecom operator by subscribers, on Thursday announced the commercial launch of its high speed 4G services (also called LTE) in 296 towns across India. Airtel customers can enjoy 4G at 3G data prices, with packs starting at Rs 25, the telecom operator said in a statement. Bharti Airtel had earlier launched 4G service in select cities in India. Airtel also announced tie-ups with Flipkart and Samsung for bundling 4G handsets with its services. Airtel has also launched an automated platform called Flexpage that allows customers to track their data usage and get real time usage alerts. With Flexpage, customers can also upgrade their mobile plan on the go, as and when they exhaust their monthly data quota. Under this platform, customers can opt from a range of 4G data plans, with prices starting from Rs 100. To get started on Airtel 4G, customers need to switch to a 4G SIM. Apart from Airtel stores, Samsung retail stores will also facilitate 4G SIM swaps, the telecom operator said. “We are also doing home-delivery of SIMs for post-paid connections,” said Gopal Vittal, MD & CEO (India & South Asia), Bharti Airtel.

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Landline telephone connections in the country have fallen by over 15 per cent in the last two- and-a-half years to 26.15 million at the end of June this year, Parliament was informed. The number of landline phone connections declined to 26.15 million at the end of June, 2015 from 30.79 million as on December 31, 2012, Minister of Communications and Information Technology Ravi Shankar Prasad said in a written reply to the Rajya Sabha. The number of connections have declined steadily to 28.89 million (December, 2013), 27 million (December, 2014) to 26.15 million at the end of June, 2015, he added. The Minister said the main reasons for the decline in landline telephone connections are: tendency to shift to mobile services, high maintenance cost and frequent interruption due to cable damage resulting in quality of services being affected.

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India has over 790 million mobile users with a penetration rate of 65 percent. With mobile users in India growing by a whopping 20 million every month, many international mobile manufacturing companies are launching smart phones to grab a larger share of the Indian market. The mobile industry is growing at a great pace in India and is contributing around USD 400 billion to India’s GDP. India is currently the second-largest telecommunication market and has the third highest number of internet users in the world. The huge potential attracts the foreign players to invest in the country. In a similar effort, a US based company Motorola chose India to launch its latest handset. Marcus Frost, Marketing Director of EMEA and India, said, “Its crucial to Motorola, in terms of the Indian mobile market. It’s one of our favourite markets that is why we are announcing the new Moto – g here in India first. India is fundamental to Motorola now and in the future.” Telecommunication is one of the prime support services needed for rapid growth and modernisation of various sectors of the economy. Manufacturers all over the world seem to have developed strategies to spread their reach to the rural parts of India as well.

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Mobile subscribers will be able to activate or deactivate internet service on their mobile phone by calling or sending an SMS to a new toll free number 1925 from next month onwards. The new directive from telecom regulator TRAI follows a large number of complaints from customers that mobile operators were keeping the process of deactivation very complex to earn extra revenue. The directive issued today mandates telecom operators to provide toll free number ‘1925’ from September 1 to activate or deactivate mobile internet service either by making a call on the number and following instruction or by sending a SMS. Source

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Enterprises want cloud services and cloud connectivity – but it’s hard to shop for services if every vendor uses its own terminology, and if there are no interoperability standard to help define those services. Two strong advocates for such standards are the MEF and OpenCloud Connect (OCC). The latter is the industry organization behind the OpenCloud Project, and the chair of that project, Sebastien Jobert, is also Director of Engineering with Iometrix. He explains, “This is the beginning of a cycle, of a migration cycle; certainly not the end of the cycle. Let’s focus on the migration of business-critical application to the cloud, maybe in a context that is not necessarily a greenfield, but where there are legacy applications running for larger enterprises.” Jobert continues, “OpenCloud Connect has a similar ambition for cloud services, to define a common terminology and define basically trusted, carrier-grade cloud services that will help this migration of business-critical application to the cloud in a technology-agnostic manner. You can build your cloud service based on OpenStack, open source or other solution if you want — as long as we have a common understanding of the services and that the solution that you deliver as a cloud service provider meets the requirements and is fully understood by the enterprise that is buying the service, that’s sufficient to help the enterprise migration.” Jeff Schmitz, chairman of OpenCloud Connect, built on Jobert’s comments: “OCC has 28 companies, cloud service providers, service providers, traditional service providers, equipment manufacturers, and even test manufacturers like Spirent where I work,” he said, “where we’re emulating the traffic that goes over these services, both legitimate and malicious traffic.” Developing standards is quite an undertaking, explains Schmitz, because it encompasses so much. “When enterprises try to connect their cloud services globally, they need to talk to service providers, including telcos, datacenter providers and cloud carriers. On top of that there are thousands of cloud service providers. How do they connect in a standard way? How do they have a fair chance and a fair playing field?” The solution, says Schmitz, is to start by defining the services. “If I’m going to have a cloud service, yes, I need to know the bandwidth and the performance and the other things I need, but I also need to know the security. Depending on the service, I may need different kinds of security and I don’t want to hop-by-hop have to figure this out if I’m trying to create a global connection. I want to do that very quickly. We need a common language, a common currency of cloud-based services. The thing we need to worry about is lock-in.” Arpit Joshipura, VP Strategy, Product Management & Marketing at Dell Networking, expressed concern about the different vantage points of enterprises and service providers. “In the enterprise-centric view or an IT-centric view, the datacenter is at the heart of everything and you have campuses and remote offices and dozens of carriers as small clouds around the enterprise.” By contrast, he explains, to carriers “the data centre is a really small thing and then they’ve blown up the rest of the cloud with metro access, carrier Ethernet, edge routing and core routing. Completely different mindset, completely different perspective.” Juan Tellez, Senior Architect at Apcera, see that same issue, and sees hybrid clouds as the answer. “So, yes, there is some confusion in the market. I think corporations are beginning to look at trying to move into the cloud and they don’t want to jump whole hog into it and that’s why hybrid is a hot thing in 2015. Corporations may want to keep their databases in-house and then have some of the processing out in the cloud. They don’t want a lock in. Corporations don’t want to be stuck with just Amazon Web Services or Google Compute Engine. They want to be able to have either a standard or a way to move from one to the other, or to be able to do both at the same time, have part of your application in-house and part of the application sitting in AWS.” The answer, though, is innovation. Kevin Vachon, Chief Operating Officer at the MEF, explains it best: “There is an awful lot of innovation going on with respect to service development and new services. Obviously there is a general global trend towards development of more dynamic, on-demand type connectivity services. Much of that is driven by the cloud, but it’s equally driven by the customer need for being able to run their businesses in a more agile way as well. SDN and NFV become critical enablers of that, the ability to control the network from software, obviously cloud-driven, the ability to have virtual interfaces turned up to provide the time to market for new service types.” (Courtesy: NetEvents)

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It takes only a couple of mouse clicks to list a vintage lamp for sale on eBay, or to buy some shoes on Amazon.com, to set up an equities trading account at Credit Suisse. The entire process takes minutes, at most. Yet when it comes to provisioning new broadband connectivity services, the process takes weeks or perhaps months, often requiring human intervention to plug in a copper or fiber-optic cable, flip switches, configure routers via a command-line interface, set up billing, determine service-level agreements (SLAs). And that’s only the start of it. It’s time for the provisioning of 21st-century data services to enter, well, the 21st century. That’s starting to happen, and a key geography for faster-provisioning services is Asia Pacific, where APAC carriers are beginning to embrace the concept of Lifecycle Service Orchestration in the wholesale and interconnect markets. Lifecycle Service Orchestration (LSO) is an initiative of the MEF which defines a range of automation as part of LSO’s capabilities: Fulfillment, Control, Performance, Assurance, Usage and Analytics. The idea is that telecommunications services will be orchestrated among all the participating players in the value chain, including service providers, operators, enterprises, and even end-user subscribers. The result: coordinated end-to-end management and control, which will dramatically decrease the time to establish and modify the characteristics of the service, but also ensure quality and security end-to-end. Strong vision – and it’s going to be big. According to the Rayno Report in March 2015, the LSO market is going to be large – $2.75 billion by 2019. “But more importantly, it will be very strategic.” The report, entitled, “Service Provider Lifecycle Service Orchestration (LSO) Overview and Market Forecast,” continues, “The providers that can deliver more flexible and agile services will be perceived as the leaders. In addition, a move to LSO platforms will improve business workflow and operations efficiencies. Many service providers and software companies are betting their futures on it. The move to this services model may prove to be ‘table stakes’ for the service providers of the future.” In a presentation at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Rayno Report founder R. Scott Raynovich said that LSO is clearly more than just a buzzword, but also a real market prospect. “To take one of the top items on the service providers’ wish list, LSO would enable you to set up a simple self-service customer portal that allows the customer to specify the network service they want, without any knowledge of the network or the technology needed to deliver it. And the service comes online within minutes, automatically, without any interaction with Customer Services or the technical team.” Raynovich continued, “The bottom line? Global operators told us that they need this stuff. Our research shows that spending is already starting to ramp, and service providers could migrate between 20% and 50% of their OSS spending to the LSO market over the next five years.” That brings us to APAC. Shahar Steiff, AVP of Hong Kong-based PCCW Global, “APAC is notorious for building value through partnership. LSO is a key enabler.” Steiff explained that PCCW Global is currently enhancing its own network to support LSO-like automation and service. “PCCW Global is committed, though, to adopt LSO standards when they become available, as inter-carrier services are a significant element of our portfolio,” he said, adding, “PCCW Global is also very active in multiple organizations, MEF included, who contribute towards the realization of automated inter-carrier services. Inter-carrier services is a multi-billion USD market today. Its automation through LSO will further increase its value.” Even while LSO technology and standards continue to mature, one of the largest players in APAC is not waiting. Telstra already offers self-provisioned dynamic network services to its customers through Telstra’s PEN Platform. PEN employs Software Defined Networking (SDN) to enable on-demand connectivity and bandwidth. Initially offered in 2013 for Ethernet services, Telstra recently announced that PEN has been extended to the optical layer, enabling on-demand high-bandwidth provisioning up to 100 Gbps. This optical transport SDN capability is enabled by Infinera’s Open Transport Switch (OTS) and Intelligent Transport Network. As Stu Elby, senior vice president, Cloud network strategy and technology at Infinera noted, “The production deployment of the Infinera Open Transport Switch to support this innovative new service demonstrates how an open networking approach, combined with a DevOps model, reduces time to market for new services.” Infinera is also in the process of extending SDN control capabilities to its Packet Switching Module (PXM), which enables MEF Ethernet services to be provisioned directly on an Infinera transport network. This level of full dynamic SDN control of packet optical networks is a key enabler for service providers to actually deliver on the promises of LSO automation. Telin Singapore has been developing SDN, NFV with LSO to connect between Telin Singapore Data Center 1, Singapore Data Center 2 and coming soon Singapore Data Center 3. The strategy provides network SLA starting from network planning, fulfillment and assurance to provide bandwidth on demand and cost efficiency between data center traffic across multi data centers in Singapore. CENX is a Lifecycle Service Orchestration vendor whose software solutions automate the fulfillment and assurance of data connectivity services, bridging legacy physical networks and new virtualized networks. CENX site the APAC region as at the forefront of technology adoption in order to meet its population’s explosive demand for data connectivity. Chris Purdy, CTO of CENX said “We are seeing high demand from APAC operators for LSO solutions given their early adoption of NFV and the competitive marketplace that places high value on on-demand connectivity and real-time service assurance. They have been quick to recognize the inherent challenges of a dynamic NFV infrastructure and the need for LSO tools to manage network operations holistically.” “Furthermore, operators are able to put the power of LSO into the hands of their own enterprise and data center customers. Using a self-service portal, customers are able to order and provision reliable high-performance connectivity on-demand, and also monitor whether they are receiving the contracted service quality,” added Purdy. “That translates to satisfied and loyal customers for the operator.” Another key player in the APAC region is Wedge Networks, which offers Security-as-a-Service through its NFV-based product family, Cloud Network Defense. According to Dr. Hongwen Zhang, founder and CEO of Wedge, “APAC is a fast-growing market, and service providers are well ahead in their desire to move to a modern model that suits the new network paradigm. In APAC, the industry is moving to a more modern world in which services can be instantly delivered and managed, regardless of the network and regardless of the service provider. LSO is key enabler of this modern world and the transition to SDN and NFV.” Zhang continued, “Service providers need to quickly provision, launch, and manage dynamic services to meet customer demand. Of course security is of utmost importance. It is impossible to deliver security using the old network paradigm as most security companies continue to do – fighting individual battles on the devices themselves or at individual gateways will no longer work. Next generation network and cloud architectures present a new opportunity to get security right; to truly embed it in the infrastructure as a flexible, highly available, orchestrated service. A few mouse clicks to purchase a vintage lamp. A few clicks to set up online financial services. A few clicks, someday soon, to provision high-speed interconnects to link business locations from Singapore to Seoul to Sydney to Shanghai to Ho Chi Minh City with no human intervention, no truck rolls, no month-long delays before the circuits light up. It’s a compelling vision — and a multi-billion-dollar market.

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The total number of telephone connections in India crossed one billion mark in May, data released by the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) said here on Saturday. The total number of telecom subscription stood at 1,002.05 million at the end of May, out of which 975.78 million were wireless connections and 26.27 were wireline.”The number of telephone subscribers in India increased from 999.71 million at the end of April 2015 to 1,002.05 million at the end of May 2015, thereby showing a monthly growth rate of 0.23 percent,” the TRAI statement said. Source

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Chinese telecoms giant Huawei Technologies Co has won security clearance to manufacture telecoms equipment in India, paving the way for it to become the first major Chinese brand to supply locally made products for one of the world`s biggest markets for mobile phones. The green light from the Ministry of Home Affairs, confirmed by an official on Wednesday, comes 19 months after Huawei first applied for a manufacturing licence, amid wrangling over national security concerns. It also marks a significant boost for Prime Minister Narendra Modi`s `Make in India` campaign.Source http://zeenews.india.com/business/news/technology/chinas-huawei-gets-security-clearance-to-manufacture-telecom-equipments-in-india_131458.html

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Investment commitment of USD 75 billion or Rs 4,72,500 crore was received from industry at the launch of Digital India week, Telecom Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said here today. “On Digital India day (July 1), you will be happy to know that we made a very decisive initiative that investors — global and Indian — must declare their intention to invest in India…On a single day in a programme of two hours we were pledged USD 75 billion investment in the field of ICT and other allied services,” Prasad said while launching Indo-Africa ICT Expo. Source

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